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personal, intimate relationship. The spirits – in secular terms: the memories – of the dead arrive at the altar to share a moment with the living. They are received with the ap- propriate food and drinks, precisely the ones they enjoyed during their life. Choosing and preparing the food and drinks (did

Open Access
In: Time and the Ancestors

(under sunlight) as well as a life in nature in the form of animals and/or natural phenomena (nahuales), a life of reason and one of vision. This is still the key to the Mesoamerican living religious experience today. Typically, the Spanish missionaries condemned nahualism, i.e. the idea of

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In: Time and the Ancestors

instrument and the staff are much more than just objects; they are to be understood as symbols with agency, i.e. as living beings. These ceremonial elements are located in specific temples, such as a temple surrounded by the Plumed Serpent. Below that temple we often see a dark place, dedicated to the

Open Access
In: Time and the Ancestors
Author: Willem Frijhoff

, and Albany, N.Y.: SUNY Press, 2009). 2 Stadsarchief Amsterdam [City Archive of Amsterdam] (abbreviated SAA), Archief Nederlands Hervormde Kerkenraad [Archive of Dutch Reformed Consistory] (PA 376), inv. no. 5, p. 157. 3 A. Eekhof, Jonas Michaëlius, Founder of the Church in New Netherland: His Life and

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In: Journal of Early American History

) experienced and reacted to the news of forcible removal across state lines in early-nineteenth-century America, with a particular emphasis on the theme of family separation as a motivating factor behind the actions and reactions of many bondspeople. It also seeks to formulate a middle ground in the decades

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In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Matteo Lazzari

or sisters. On the contrary, he provided accurate information about a paternal uncle, named Gaspar Riveros, who was living in San Cristobal de La Havana, Cuba in the 1650s. His uncle “is sixty years old, he does not have any office and he is a knight of San Cristobal; he is married to a woman called

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In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Sophie H. Jones

memorial to highlight that ‘the change from a very plentiful living on a farm highly improved to a wilderness in advanced life is really hard. ’ Ibid. AO 12/25, 373–81 (quoted p. 374); David Bell, Loyalist Rebellion in New Brunswick: A Defining Conflict for Canada’s Political Culture (Halifax, NS

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In: Journal of Early American History
Author: Agnès Delahaye

negatively as the downside of Winthrop’s dilemma structuring the story, “the same large paradox that had troubled Winthrop from the beginning, the paradox that required a man to live in the world without being of it.” Running and managing the Company and the settlement, or living in the world, were both

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In: Settling the Good Land
Author: Daniel Murphree

as Mi’kmaqs. Subsisting on gathering, hunting, and marine life, these people had traded with European fishermen long before Cartier arrived in the early sixteenth century. Culturally adaptive, the Mi’kmaq enjoyed a fluid political system similar in some ways to both tribal and chiefdom structures

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In: Journal of Early American History

the case that a constitutional “agenda of equal representation,” as Nathan Kozuskanich has put it, motivated these backcountry settlers. 5 The manuscript “humble Petition” seems in its form to be a draft of the Remonstrance . But this “humble Petition,” by revealing the violent agenda covered over

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In: Journal of Early American History