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Author: Richard Jasnow

same oath. Oaths can be taken in either a judicial setting, that is, before legal authorities in a court, or in non-judicial settings, that is, in the course of daily life.251 3.3.3.1 An oath could require a person to report the wrongdoings of others. Thus, in the Strike Papyrus, it is stated:252 “That

In: A History of Ancient Near Eastern Law (2 vols)
Author: Amnon Altman

,17 says: (the god) Šamaš ought to investigate and decide on your conduct and mine. i have acted as father and brother to you; toward me, you have acted as a villain and enemy. What good was it that, by means of the weapons of (the god) Addu and yarim- lim, i saved the city of Babylon and gave life

In: Tracing the Earliest Recorded Concepts of International Law
Author: J.G. Oudshoorn

contract denoting the start of the marriage (recall P.Yadin 18, where Shelamzion is described as a virgin when she is given to Judah Cimber), this reference to continuing life together is dif- fi cult to grasp. Was the couple actually living together without a formal marriage contract having been drawn

In: The Relationship between Roman and Local Law in the Babatha and Salome Komaise Archives
Author: Amnon Altman

fact, such a practice, which was actually a call to submit, is known to have been followed also by the Assyrians (see e.g. II Kings 18:1–37) and by other nations (e.g. Judges 11:4–28; I samuel 11:1–2). But it was motivated by the drive to save time, resources and lives of the attackers rather than

In: Tracing the Earliest Recorded Concepts of International Law
Author: Daniel C. Snell

obligations for those indentured families, citizens of Lagas living as debtors because of grain taxes, barley payments, theft or murder. We know something ofthe political contexts of these statements. The ruler was facing an increasingly desperate fight with a neighboring city-state and wanted to assure

In: Flight and Freedom in the Ancient Near East

's remedy. Its purpose was to make creditors more secure and not to give the debtor a fresh start nor to allow a failing business to survive by reorganizing. These con- cerns, which often motivate modern bankruptcy legislation, were absent from bankruptcy's early history. Rather, the bankruptcy statutes

In: Security for Debt in Ancient Near Eastern Law
Author: Jacob Lauinger

[51.05], which, as an administrative text, should have had a relatively shorter shelf life. The witnesses of AlT 78 [23.05] are harder to date but seem to be from the middle of Level VII. Strictly on prosopographic grounds, then, one would expect AlT 78 [23.05] to antedate the other three texts

In: Following the Man of Yamhad
Author: J.G. Oudshoorn

purchase contract is not like a contract at all (conveying the sense of reciprocity) but more like a unilateral declaration on the part of one of the parties. Th erefore, I would rather style it an acknowledgement of receipt.41 Consequently, I am not sure that as Newman states ‘life would be much

In: The Relationship between Roman and Local Law in the Babatha and Salome Komaise Archives
Author: Samuel Belkin

the youths are permitted, after they are fourteen years of age, to use harlots and strumpets, and women who make gain by their persons, without restraint. But among w a harlot is not allowed to live, but death is a punishment for any one who adopts such a way of life. Therefore, before our lawful

In: Philo and the Oral Law
Author: Samuel Belkin

courts, or whether they are based upon purely theoretical discussions. Furthermore, a student of Philo has to solve the problem of what motivated Philo to write these special treatises on law; for, inasmuch as his primary interest was philosophy, he would naturally not have written such a stupendous

In: Philo and the Oral Law