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Author: Peter J. Brand

reign when the chapel for Ramesses I at Abydos was being decorated, and to a later one towards the end of Seti' s life during his alleged coregency with Ramesses II. Mysliwiec's treatment of Seti's later relief style, found at Abydos, Gumah, KV 17 and the Karnak Hypostyle Hall, is masterful, but

In: The Monuments of Seti I
Author: Peter J. Brand

deified, for he holds the crook and flail in one hand and a mace in the other. Behind him Prince Ramesses holds aloft a bw-fan behind his father that serves as a mark both ofRamesses' status as a royal son and of Seti's divinity. 114 This divine iconography is appropriate both for living and deceased

In: The Monuments of Seti I
Author: Heike Behlmer

HEIKE BEHLMER THE CITY AS METAPHOR IN THE WORKS OF TWO PANOPOLITANS: SHENOUTE AND BESA* A constant presence in the political and religious life of Late Antique Panopolis - and vice versa - was the Monastery of Apa Shenoute across the Nile. 1 Real-life Panopolis and its inhabitants though as

In: Perspectives on Panopolis: An Egyptian town from Alexander the Great to the Arab Conquest

). Either way, Cauville reaches the heart of the matter: Osiris, as the m˙w, floats—sus- pended—between the two worlds of life and death, that is, outside the cycle of enduring life. 12 Borghouts, Magical Texts, ix. Thoth’s rescue of Osiris makes up a “mythischen Präzedenzfall,” Osing, Papyrus, 49. 98

In: Papyrus British Museum 10808 and its Cultural and Religious Setting
Author: Jeremy Pope

Meritefnut should continue in life ( Ꜥnḫ ḥm.t-nṯr Mry.t-Tfnw.t ), followed immediately by a reference to Shepenwepet II as “living” ( Ꜥnḫ.tἰ ). If Meritefnut were the missing prenomen of Amenirdis II, then a co-tenure between her and Shepenwepet II appears unavoidable. Such an arrangement must not be

In: Journal of Egyptian History

specific environment with flora, fauna, minerals, and human life represented, reinforce the documentary sense that the expedition leaders effectively reached a land different from any land in the ancient Egyptian imagination and expectation. However, notwithstanding the amount of details represented

In: Journal of Egyptian History

exhibits figural and textual offerings on many subjects (religious, historical), in many media (carving, ink), and on a variety of canvasses (rock cliffs, temple walls). Inscriptional content reveals that rock inscription carving was motivated by many different primary goals: they could serve as

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In: Journal of Egyptian History

immediately above the representation of an animal is in fact its generic name and nothing else (such as the name of the animal while it is engaged in certain activities, or the name of the animal at a certain stage in its life), then we may be justified in saying that the figure in our relief is an x, and

In: Papyrus British Museum 10808 and its Cultural and Religious Setting

vessels of choice and “workhorses” of ancient Egypt. So dominant was maritime life in the Egyptian worldview that the earth was imagined as floating on a universe of inert and dark primordial waters, known as nw or nwn . 15 It should not be surprising, then, that watercraft were an essential part of

In: Journal of Egyptian History

point linking ancient Egypt with modern Europe. The economist Peter Temin assumes that “ordinary Romans lived well […] as a result of extensive markets” 24 and this allows him to suggest that the average standard of living in the Roman world was close to that of the 17th century Netherlands. 25 In

In: Journal of Egyptian History