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a consideration of living idols that required care and maintenance. Again and again, objects that seem to have ex- hausted their store of historical information become not deconstructed but re-constructed under Irene’s gaze, opening up new possibilities for understanding them. Fully engaged in

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context
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Air France jet from the airport near the Sasanian capital constructed especially for orientalists ... 1 " Al-e Ahmad did not live to contemplate the irony of his dismissal of the Sasanians as irrelevant to the real problems of contemporary Iran ian life. Then as now a ruthless fanatic, Kartir

In: Iranica Varia: Papers in Honor of Professor Ehsan Yarshater
Authors: and

a ritual there would be an increased resonance. That is, for someone standing in the room with the altar, to have a third, living king join his carved representations in worship could only add to the significance of the event. For an audi- ence not-present for the use of the object (or if these

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context
Authors: and

ancestor cult, Katuwas at least conceptually intensified the power of the living king by portraying him as a future deity. Both his and his father’s strategies brought the tradition of ancestor cult into the political sphere of Carchemish, perhaps in order to present the royal ancestor cult to the

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context
Authors: and

himself to the great Mesopotamian empire of the past. The Bisitun (or Behistun) relief, carved into the living rock of the Zagros mountains, rises approximately 100 meters above a highway leading from central Mesopotamia (Babylon) to the Iranian plateau and the Median capital of Ecbatana (Hamadan

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context
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and Early Bronze Age, i.e. at the beginning of the third millennium. Thus there is nothing to suggest that apsidal plans evolved through a sequence from curvilinear to rectilinear construction. Perhaps it is possible to speak of an ever living memory of Rundbau applied where structurally

In: Ancient Building in South Syria and Palestine
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insights from philosopher and cultural historian Michel De Certeau, 59 who is interested in the idea of the city as a locus of everyday life and the people who are actively engaged in the continuous production of living space. The views of Samuels and De Certeau with respect to ‘landscape authorship’ are

Open Access
In: The Saqqara Necropolis through the New Kingdom

requirement not to represent living things figura- tively, a stronger view of one of the points Appelbaum noted. Before turning to that, I briefly describe three major influences on Herod. (1) Hellenistic architecture was obviously the most vigorous cultural determinant on Herod’s buildings. This exuberant

In: Building Jewish in the Roman East
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its present-day form, the pyramid represents the sum total of all its transformations through time. Its early contemporaries witnessed the pyramid in its early life (set in a temporally different landscape), whereas we today witness it at a more advanced age 13 —which does not represent the end of its

Open Access
In: The Saqqara Necropolis through the New Kingdom

very little in the way of grand synthesis. His temper was that of the empiri- cist; his perspective that of the local; his ambition to map the life of a small com- munity of Cairene Jews as minutely as was possible.4 Yet, paradoxically, it is to his approach that the two authors are, perhaps, most

In: Ancient West & East