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Authors: M. Feldman and J. Cheng

a consideration of living idols that required care and maintenance. Again and again, objects that seem to have ex- hausted their store of historical information become not deconstructed but re-constructed under Irene’s gaze, opening up new possibilities for understanding them. Fully engaged in

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context
Authors: M. Feldman and J. Cheng

a ritual there would be an increased resonance. That is, for someone standing in the room with the altar, to have a third, living king join his carved representations in worship could only add to the significance of the event. For an audi- ence not-present for the use of the object (or if these

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context
Authors: M. Feldman and J. Cheng

ancestor cult, Katuwas at least conceptually intensified the power of the living king by portraying him as a future deity. Both his and his father’s strategies brought the tradition of ancestor cult into the political sphere of Carchemish, perhaps in order to present the royal ancestor cult to the

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context
Authors: M. Feldman and J. Cheng

himself to the great Mesopotamian empire of the past. The Bisitun (or Behistun) relief, carved into the living rock of the Zagros mountains, rises approximately 100 meters above a highway leading from central Mesopotamia (Babylon) to the Iranian plateau and the Median capital of Ecbatana (Hamadan

In: Ancient Near Eastern Art in Context

requirement not to represent living things figura- tively, a stronger view of one of the points Appelbaum noted. Before turning to that, I briefly describe three major influences on Herod. (1) Hellenistic architecture was obviously the most vigorous cultural determinant on Herod’s buildings. This exuberant

In: Building Jewish in the Roman East

very little in the way of grand synthesis. His temper was that of the empiri- cist; his perspective that of the local; his ambition to map the life of a small com- munity of Cairene Jews as minutely as was possible.4 Yet, paradoxically, it is to his approach that the two authors are, perhaps, most

In: Ancient West & East

DECORATION AND ARCHITECTURE: THE DEFINITION OF PRIVATE TOMB ENVIRONMENT Violaine Chauvet Johns Hopkins University The conception of Old Kingdom mastabas as the afterlife environment for the soul of the de- ceased and a place of ritual for the living rests on a complex, planned interplay between

In: Servant of Mut
Author: Harold M. Hays

this subjectivity. A particular “I” or “you”—the text owner—was ubiquitously present in their prior forms, and in the sacerdotal texts there was often a speaking “I” of the living officiant versus an inert, symbolized object of worship. Because of the subjectivity of the texts, it is crucial to take

Open Access
In: The Organization of the Pyramid Texts (2 vols.)

, since Herod was facing imminent death. The law of Israel, they said, for- bade images and likenesses of living things; “it was erected in defiance of their fathers’ laws. It was in fact unlawful to place in the temple either images or busts or any representation whatsoever of a living creature” (War 1

In: Building Jewish in the Roman East
Author: Nils Billing

for Pepy”], say the bas of Heliopolis. They provide him with life and dominion ( ꜥnḫ wꜣs ). “May he live [with the living, may] Sokar [live] with the living. May he live with the living, [may this Pepy live with the living”]. (Pyr. 1289a

In: The Performative Structure