Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 256 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Kun Qian

/imperial/Han culture is corrupt or stagnant and only by stepping outside of that culture can one find a cure for it. Su Tong’s Wu Zetian and My Life as Emperor: The Individual Against History Su Tong is well known for a number of works of historical fiction, which the Chinese critical field defined as part of what

In: Imperial-Time-Order
Author: Chris Fraser

-sufficient living off the land.3 The Mohist “school” is depicted as a flourishing, disciplined organization that attracts and trains students, recommends them for official posts or dispatches them on military assignments, and is supported by donations from them once they are employed. it is difficult to say to

In: The Mozi as an Evolving Text
Author: Kun Qian

up the throne, would he be content with living his life as a commonplace man without any great accomplishment? . . . He should remember what the imperial grandmother told him: what he shoulders is the cause handed down from his ancestors, the great empire with bound- less territories, and millions

In: Imperial-Time-Order
Author: Carine Defoort

does the “this” 此 of the conclusion refer to? it refers to his own interpretation of this moral imperative to care for others, arguing that someone who dedicates his life to the noble cause of ordering the world has to diagnose the political disease and subsequently suggest a remedy. Furthermore

In: The Mozi as an Evolving Text
Author: Kun Qian

fixes the goal of life. Second, this self is filled with a fiery, selfless determination to ‘struggle’ for this goal. Third, thus determined, the self is with ‘the people’ or with the people’s ‘real’ desires. Fourth, in this struggle, perceived historical tenden- cies constitute a ‘tide’ filled with

In: Imperial-Time-Order
Author: Roel Sterckx

Zhanguo thinker, with the exception of Mozi, assigns divine forces any significant role in political and social life.” see pines, Foundations of Confucian Thought, 55. pines’s statement holds only if one uses a very narrow definition of “divine forces” and excludes, for example, ancestral spirits.  11

In: The Mozi as an Evolving Text
Author: Kun Qian

- damentally humanistic. The shi, albeit amoral as such, is a kind of situational timeliness, not of empirical events but a humanly shaped milieu.9 Indeed, time and history in the Chinese sense saw the constant interplay between transcendent time and lived time in human beings. Witnessing history and living

In: Imperial-Time-Order
Author: Mathew A. Foust

familiar and paradigmatic example of gongfu, its core meaning is the art of life in general, including efforts, methods, and cultivated and embodied methods of living well. Ni makes the case that instead of taking the human subject for granted as rational choice makers, gongfu takes ethics as mainly a

Free access
In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
Author: Donald Blakeley

, and how death will deprive us of such values.12 This might very well be true and it may function to motivate a sense of seriousness about using one’s time and resources well, but what is understood here is not death itself but the loss of life. Such a claim also supposes that the condition of death

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy

. (Ly 20-3) One can see that these admonishments are within the capacity of any individual to incorporate in his social practice and to live up to as a motto of life. After continued practice it can become a habit and style of conduct which would establish both the social credibility and the moral

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy