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) places him among the tradition’s most important figures, with some according him the same messianic status as Madhva himself. 2 Vādirāja was a Brahman monastic ( saṃnyāsin ), but his livelihood was entangled with the fortunes and follies of royal donors and courtly life. Aside from a stray land grant or

In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History
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istig̱ẖnā be-hamrasānad ). 60 In the Urdu translation, Maulvī Ḥusainuddīn expanded upon this anecdote and presented the Sufis’ decision as being motivated by the need to enable people to gain wealth so that they could spend more time in prayer without having to worry about earning a living. As he

In: Journal of South Asian Intellectual History
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with, all work. If one chooses to learn something in which he is interested, he will be persistent in his learning and highly motivated in his work, with remarkable outcomes. Life is finite, but knowledge is infinite. One may endure a lack of food and water, but not a lack of truth. One may calmly

In: Cai Yuanpei: Selected Writings on Education
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/imperial/Han culture is corrupt or stagnant and only by stepping outside of that culture can one find a cure for it. Su Tong’s Wu Zetian and My Life as Emperor: The Individual Against History Su Tong is well known for a number of works of historical fiction, which the Chinese critical field defined as part of what

In: Imperial-Time-Order
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human existence in a field of tension between life and spirit. Cassirer understands such a form of metaphysics as a synthesis of the preceding analyses of the objective expressive forms (the symbolic forms), which is to fall under the concept of life and that of a living subjectivity

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate
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beings is seen as a self-motivating and self-transcending movement. The mode of being of this movement, the human being’s form of life, is called “existence” or “ecstatic temporality” (Cf. Heidegger, 1986, §§ 45–83). So far so good, when it comes to the common ground between Cassirer and

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate
Author:

. Advancing a critical ideal of form requires more than the elaboration of an abstract concept. When we ask what this concept of form is about, the answer is straightforward and can be contextualised within the intellectual horizon of their time: it is the form of life, or the living form. Building upon a new

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate

human beings, or what he calls the “eudaemonistic impulse” ( kōfukushugiteki keikō 幸福主義的傾向), that which arises internally but then connects with the material world through affective relationships in order to create a place where people are actually living the good life (Curley, 2017, p. 130). Toward

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate

outside his own philosophical path. 2 As for Nishida, his encounter with Kantian philosophy was motivated by his wish to go deeper into methodological questions and refine his instruments of critical analysis. 3 This stage of his work is documented by a series of essays written over the years

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate
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-sufficient living off the land.3 The Mohist “school” is depicted as a flourishing, disciplined organization that attracts and trains students, recommends them for official posts or dispatches them on military assignments, and is supported by donations from them once they are employed. it is difficult to say to

In: The Mozi as an Evolving Text