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Author: Sachiko Kawai

Chapter Eight Sen’yōmon-in’s Final Years and the Transfer of Her Estates “Property has its duties as well as its rights.”1 This comment was made by an eighteenth-century man, but it nonetheless epito- mizes a core concern throughout Sen’yōmon-in’s life. She shouldered a wide range of duties

In: Uncertain Powers

in this life, no matter how gravely and how often a person has sinned. Right action, however, becomes painful to those who have performed serious sins, and wrong action pleasant; they become like the sinners in Job 30, who are so corrupted as to find pleasure living “under the briers” (sub

In: A Companion to Albert the Great
Author: Sachiko Kawai

the Heian capital—5.4 kilometers from north to south and 4.4 kilometers from west to east—having a well-located main residence and headquarters was a decided advantage. By living near these dynamic zones of the capital, a nyoin like Sen’yōmon-in could increase her opportunity to access skilled

In: Uncertain Powers

themselves to metaphysics or divine science only in the last part of their life. see Alb., Super Ethica 6.9.530c, ed. colon. 14/2, 455, lns. 70–77; see above note 45. 93 Alb., De intell. et intellig. 2.1.6, borgn. 9, 512b–513a; Summa de mir. scient. dei 1, prol., ed. colon. 34/1, 3, lns. 29–53; Super

In: A Companion to Albert the Great
Author: Jin Feng

-based Jinjiang, Yaya Bay was founded in August 2008 by a group of young Chinese men working and living in the Washington, DC, area in the United States. They established this online discussion forum, using a software program that they themselves wrote, as a venue for exchanging tips about investment in the

In: Romancing the Internet
Author: Hiroko Kawanami

in their next life. And for that reason alone, many of their initial fears and anxieties were taken care of. I spent a lot of time trying to obtain concrete explanations beyond the implication that it was “good” to become a nun, and under- stand why kútho was so fundamental in motivating them to

In: Renunciation and Empowerment of Buddhist Nuns in Myanmar-Burma
Author: Shengqing Wu

life and untimely death. Modern Chinese historiography – motivated by multiple political and cultural reasons – retrospectively reconstructs Qiu Jin as a martyr and depicts her heroism with causality and coherence. Hu’s critical purpose is not simply to deconstruct the sacredness of her martyrdom, but

In: NAN NÜ
Author: Hiroko Kawanami

conduct and purity. The term shin in this con- text means the “one who upholds” or “one who is equipped with.” Hence as one word, thiláshin signifies a female practitioner who observes the Buddhist precepts and upholds an ethical criterion of a virtuous life. Her religious position may appear

In: Renunciation and Empowerment of Buddhist Nuns in Myanmar-Burma
Author: Jianhua Chen

wanted by Chiang Kai-shek and had no choice but to live an underground life. I couldn’t get a job either, of course, and therefore had to resort to writing in order to make a living.” 8 Based on these excerpts, one might imagine that Mao Dun’s life at the time must have been quite distant from

In: Revolution and Form

women’s image of themselves. Nowadays Chinese women see themselves as capable of holding their own in an increasingly globalized economy. This phenomenon, however, has not resulted in a de-valuation of family life in favor of strict unmodulated individualism. For most women, a fulfilled life continues

In: NAN NÜ