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living things is a concession of God's grace and not a privilege of man's whim. [295] BIBLICAL DIET LAWS 111 Kashrut~ then, is the Torah's prerequisite for the ethical life. Only through a daily regimen of disciplines which remind man that life is sacred can man aspire to a way of life fully

In: Studies in cultic theology and terminology

they came to formulate a unique value category which can be termed price-less value, or, even more paradoxically, valueless value. Subjective and Objective Value The Talmudic treatment of the dichotomy relating to value is bound up with the investigation of "human life value", as concep­ tualized

In: Economic Analysis in Talmudic Literature

entrance and exit to the world: “… there is for all mankind one entrance into life, and an equal departure” (µία δὲ πάντων εἴσοδος εἰς τὸν βίον ἔξοδός τε ἴση, 7:6). Ben Sira utilizes σὰρξ in a similar manner, “ All living beings become old like a garment (πᾶσα σὰρξ 20 [ כל הבשר , A 6r:6] ὡς ἱµάτιον

In: On Human Nature in Early Judaism

season, and He is the owner of all the seasons" [I 132, II 214]. And in a similar vein he puts into God's mouth the words: "I, even I, am He, to whom the life of the world belongs" [I III, II 187]. This latter statement could mean no more than that God is the sole owner of living beings in the world

In: A Samaritan Philosophy

chapter concerning Marqah's psychology it can come as no surprise to find that in his ethics great emphasis is placed on the importance of knowledge and wisdom. Marqah certainly regarded knowledge of how to live a good life (1'::l~ l"n) as a necessary condition for living such a life. Indeed, the

In: A Samaritan Philosophy
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... said, "He is called an abomination ... " (b. Y oma 72b) 298 THE LIFE OF THE SCHOOLS Abaye also found occasion to warn against hypocrisy. A way of living which stressed mastery of holy books and performance of cere­ monial actions could easily be made a facade behind which various vices could

In: A History of the Jews in Babylonia, Part 4. The Age of Shapur II
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is not like his outside is no disciple of the sages." Abaye ... said, "He is called an abomination .. .'' (b. Y oma 72b) 298 THE LIFE OF THE SCHOOLS Abaye also found occasion to warn against hypocrisy. A way of living which stressed mastery of holy books and performance of cere­ monial actions

In: A History of the Jews in Babylonia, Part 3. From Shapur I to Shapur II

"Origenist." Not all the data concerned are equally documented. Some of them would remain speculative. But substantial evidence allows a clear enough outline ofEusebius' consistent and life-long dependency on the Alexandrian master. As an anticipated conclusion it can be stated at the EUSEBIUS OF

In: Eusebius, Christianity and Judaism

writings such as Jubilees, and later in Rabbinic texts that elaborate on the idea of a cosmic navel— omphalos —represented by a foundation stone on the very place where God began to create the world. 9 In rabbinic circles, such ideas where part of a religious and politically motivated “world

In: Metaphors in the Prophetic Literature of the Hebrew Bible and Beyond
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streets and the fields would have been his familiar world. Had he stayed, he would have become a locally famous man. His learning already had set him apart for dis­ tinction. But even from his youth he must have had the sense that he would walk another path and spend his life among strangers. His was

In: A Life of Rabban Yoḥanan ben Zakkai (ca. 1-80 C.E.)