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they came to formulate a unique value category which can be termed price-less value, or, even more paradoxically, valueless value. Subjective and Objective Value The Talmudic treatment of the dichotomy relating to value is bound up with the investigation of "human life value", as concep­ tualized

In: Economic Analysis in Talmudic Literature

entrance and exit to the world: “… there is for all mankind one entrance into life, and an equal departure” (µία δὲ πάντων εἴσοδος εἰς τὸν βίον ἔξοδός τε ἴση, 7:6). Ben Sira utilizes σὰρξ in a similar manner, “ All living beings become old like a garment (πᾶσα σὰρξ 20 [ כל הבשר , A 6r:6] ὡς ἱµάτιον

In: On Human Nature in Early Judaism

season, and He is the owner of all the seasons" [I 132, II 214]. And in a similar vein he puts into God's mouth the words: "I, even I, am He, to whom the life of the world belongs" [I III, II 187]. This latter statement could mean no more than that God is the sole owner of living beings in the world

In: A Samaritan Philosophy

chapter concerning Marqah's psychology it can come as no surprise to find that in his ethics great emphasis is placed on the importance of knowledge and wisdom. Marqah certainly regarded knowledge of how to live a good life (1'::l~ l"n) as a necessary condition for living such a life. Indeed, the

In: A Samaritan Philosophy
Author: Jacob Neusner

... said, "He is called an abomination ... " (b. Y oma 72b) 298 THE LIFE OF THE SCHOOLS Abaye also found occasion to warn against hypocrisy. A way of living which stressed mastery of holy books and performance of cere­ monial actions could easily be made a facade behind which various vices could

In: A History of the Jews in Babylonia, Part 4. The Age of Shapur II
Author: Jacob Neusner

streets and the fields would have been his familiar world. Had he stayed, he would have become a locally famous man. His learning already had set him apart for dis­ tinction. But even from his youth he must have had the sense that he would walk another path and spend his life among strangers. His was

In: A Life of Rabban Yoḥanan ben Zakkai (ca. 1-80 C.E.)
Author: Shannon Burkes

province, since there is a long chain of high officials being watched by even higher ones, which implies that God is the ultimate overseer and that the same pattern of authority exists at every step (5:7-8). If this is the correct inference, life in the world as a whole is analogous to living in an

In: God, Self, and Death
Author: Shannon Burkes

CHAPTER THREE WISDOM OF SOLOMON AND 4 EZRA Nothing is immortal. But only to us is it given to know that we must die. And that is a great gift: the gift of selfhood. Ursula K Le Guin As time passed and the agitations of the Maccabean revolt receded into history, Jewish life would encounter

In: God, Self, and Death

difference between humanity and cattle, Untersuchungen zur Eigenart des Buches Qohelet , BZAW 183 (New York and Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1989), 248-9. Eunny P. Lee sees the description here in Qohelet as a motivator for humanity to embrace life even more, The Vitality of Enjoyment in Qohelet

In: On Human Nature in Early Judaism

mentioned are counted as part of the period of purification. Mishnah Shabbat 9:3 (cf. Mikwaoth 8:3) interprets Ex. 19:15 to mean that a woman discharging semen on the third day after intercourse is rendered unclean. After three days the semen is considered dead, no 10ngeI a life force and not a cause of

In: The Fathers according to Rabbi Nathan (Abot de Rabbi Nathan), Version B