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periods of migration. Most of the Jews who were born in Cuba arrived in the 1960s or moved to Miami after living in other regions of Latin America or the U.S. Their migration was motivated by the Castro revolution that national- ized private business and implemented a Communist regime. The Cuban Jews

In: Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations
Author: Shirley Idelson

Jewry—the broad swath of the popula- tion who embraced a non-halakhic approach to Jewish religious and cultural life—in ways no seminary to date had done. As the first students embarked upon their course of study at jir, seismic forces across the globe were bringing unalterable change to Jewish life

In: Reappraisals and New Studies of the Modern Jewish Experience
Author: Yohai Hakak

community and possibly of other religious 174 chapter eight groups. the dichotomy of aspiring to become spiritual and get closer to divine god while living within a human and earthly body is but one of many instances in which fundamental tensions are repressed through intense rhetoric. as i showed in

In: Young Men in Israeli Haredi Yeshiva Education

book: not only Judaism as a Civilization, but Toward a Reconstruction of American Jewish Life. Kaplan’s concepts, published in 1934, became even more important in the wake of the Holocaust and the murder of six million European Jews, because, as a consequence of this disaster, American Jews had

In: Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations
Author: Erik H. Cohen

decisions over the past century to build a life and raise a family in Israel. Some of these youth come from families who have been in Israel for generations; others are chil- dren of immigrants, or are immigrants themselves. They are unique as the only Jewish population that is the majority in their home

In: Reconsidering Israel-Diaspora Relations
Author: Christian Wiese

alienated from Judaism, and motivated them to fight against what they described as the “mechanising, soul-destroying, godless expedience” of their times. Heroic deeds, changing one’s life, “Zionist living” in the Jewish community—with these programmatic demands, in his 1913 essay “Theodor Herzl und wir

In: Reappraisals and New Studies of the Modern Jewish Experience
Author: Yohai Hakak

followers; communities might engage in almost constant ideological work to keep their common vision alive among their members. among the more prevalent commitment mechanisms, Wittberg mentions “the fostering of a commonality of background and experiences in the mem- bers. communal sharing and living

In: Young Men in Israeli Haredi Yeshiva Education
Author: Zach Mann

creatures”. I was delayed in New York only a few days but had no interest in seeing it. I had seen American technology on tours of the big factories near Pittsburgh. I was even familiar with the life of the Jews in the United States: those that grew rich and those that labored hard for their living

In: Reappraisals and New Studies of the Modern Jewish Experience
Author: Janine Barker

  Negotiating a Home: Henry Rothschild and the Émigré Experience Janine Barker Henry Rothschild was among the first ‘Hitler émigrés’, leaving Germany in 1933 for university life in Cambridge. Rothschild went on to become one of the most significant figures in post-war craft, setting up

In: Exile and Everyday Life
Author: Arie M. Dubnov

for because it would enable every individual Jew to choose freely, for the first time in modern history, whether he wishes to continue living among non-Jews—as Berlin himself chose to do—or to live as a member of a Jewish community and take part in Jewish communal life. Weizmann himself was

In: Reappraisals and New Studies of the Modern Jewish Experience