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a role in Levi’s life. Nevertheless, critical sources have multiplied in recent years corresponding to an overall increase in scholarly interest in this Italian poet, which constitutes the third wave of academic attention to Levi. Thanks to these studies, new elements of Levi’s life and thought have

In: Prophet of Renewal
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the fear of death. Life in nature, life in society, life in a culture—these comprise perception, emotion, action, and creative expression in its very occurrence. Mark well: just as death stands before every person as a private event, so creative living is a private event. At the end of his book

In: A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy
Author:

his opponents, this is not what drives him. It is the religious responsibility to be a player (but not necessarily to dominate) in the creation of a shared life that motivates him. Regarding the second point, this is not predominantly a struggle between opponents but an internal struggle that is an

In: In Silence and Out Loud: Yeshayahu Leibowitz in Israeli Context
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his life to solving this conundrum, rather than a religious thinker who was employing this discussion in order to convey his conception of the inexpressible religious consciousness. A second remarkable trend in interpreting Leibowitz is the proliferation of comparisons. Leibowitz’ thought has been

In: In Silence and Out Loud: Yeshayahu Leibowitz in Israeli Context
Author:

than he had envisaged in Germany. But the decisive factor was the psychological readiness to leave and make aliyah out of a recognition that this was the only possible way with respect to the course of his personal life and also with respect to his responsibility to his people and his religion. This

In: A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy
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not religious-spiritual life. Second, Ḥibbat Zion expressed an optimistic mood that was nourished by Messianic hope and by signs of improvement of the attitude of the Great Powers to the Jews, whereas political Zionism expressed the sober pessimism of the fin-de-siècle malaise in Western culture and a

In: A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy
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of the artistic-esthetic achievement in itself as its goal. The good is the ideal that is superior to the enjoyment of the beautiful; the latter serves as a pedagogic means to the fulfillment of the former in the living reality beyond art. The message within the creative work is the main thing, not

In: A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy
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Israel knew that the transition to the new land did not promise them immediate improvement in their standard of living. On the contrary—they could expect years of grinding physical labor (to which most were not accustomed), a life of poverty, social loneliness, and having to deal with a foreign language

In: A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy
Author:

imitation of the European state, what reason could there be for a European or Western youth to come here: ‘why would he settle for an imitation when he is already living in the original?’” Good governance, even the idea of a nation state, cannot serve as a motivating factor for immigration. It is only the

In: In Silence and Out Loud: Yeshayahu Leibowitz in Israeli Context
Author:

of direct knowledge. The example of a true Jewish life will be revealed to him, and he will be persuaded to take the decisive step of “we shall do and we shall hear.” 42 In the last analysis everything was thus dependent on the convincing power of the living example. It is understandable from this

In: A History of Modern Jewish Religious Philosophy