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came to identify themselves as “Moroccan.” It was not before the late nineteenth century that an elite of Western educated Jews, living in a number of urban centers of Morocco, began to regard themselves as part of a single Moroccan Jewish community within the geographical confines of the country known

In: From Catalonia to the Caribbean: The Sephardic Orbit from Medieval to Modern Times
Author: Benjamin Ravid

or in any place could they enjoy any privilege reserved only for Venetian subjects and consequently were never to be regarded as such. But then it introduced a modifying provision that reflected a compromise intended to resolve the tension between the Venetian religiously motivated anti

In: From Catalonia to the Caribbean: The Sephardic Orbit from Medieval to Modern Times
Author: Uriah Kfir

, and literal rather than midrashic use of biblical expressions. What motivated Ibn Ezra to condemn Qilir? Why would he bother with the work of a long-gone poet, five centuries his senior? Yahalom notes the importance of context in understanding Ibn Ezra’s criticism: “It is important to realize that

In: A Matter of Geography: A New Perspective on Medieval Hebrew Poetry
Author: Aviva Ben-Ur

heavily intra-married and tiny subgroup living in a rapidly expanding city and was therefore not in a position to draw highly defined boundaries between variants of non-Ashkenazi Jews. Leaders were, however, entitled to strictly follow the first bylaw of the congregation’s regulations prohibiting “the

In: From Catalonia to the Caribbean: The Sephardic Orbit from Medieval to Modern Times
Author: Mauricio Dimant

On 15 April 1559 (“twenty-eight days in the month of Nisan”), Yehiel Nissim da Pisa published Hayye Olam ( Eternal Life ), a treatise on the social implications of money practices on Jewish life, especially the use of interest in the circuit of payment. 1 He explained his reasons for writing

Open Access
In: Religious Changes and Cultural Transformations in the Early Modern Western Sephardic Communities
Authors: Avi Bareli and Uri Cohen

.” The solution is “improving quality of life, road paving, education, and the social advancement of underprivileged ethnic groups.” However, Berger did not merely urge mapai to strengthen ties with the oriental proletariat through development and education. He stated that while the strength of a

In: The Academic Middle-Class Rebellion

disambiguity of names, 45 naming practices (naming the child after a living person), 46 name change as a result of sickness (rogativa). 47 The language choice may be testimony to the deceased’s peripatetic life as a trader, foreigner, or exile (Hebrew, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, English). Epitaphs

Open Access
In: Religious Changes and Cultural Transformations in the Early Modern Western Sephardic Communities

of her family could fall outside influences as Eva had, and she preferred to raise her other children closer to organized Portuguese Jewish life, away from the dangers of crossing borders into the Christian world. 48 3 Eva Cohen in between Judaism and Christianity Eva grew up in a home that

Open Access
In: Religious Changes and Cultural Transformations in the Early Modern Western Sephardic Communities

Interestingly, as its statutes demonstrate, the Hevra combined various aspects of community life for its members: membership provided recognition of the member’s social status as one of the wealthy leaders of the community and guaranteed a respectful burial usually reserved for important people; it gave

Open Access
In: Religious Changes and Cultural Transformations in the Early Modern Western Sephardic Communities
Authors: Avi Bareli and Uri Cohen

eve of his resignation: … with all of my devotion to the Histadrut, which I have supported my entire life in every possible way as it struggled to improve workers’ standard of living … I cannot accept that the government will approve a certain decision only … [because] it will enable the Histadrut

In: The Academic Middle-Class Rebellion