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Turkish culture in peripheral spheres of life while retaining the elements of Polish culture in central spheres. The sixth or seventh generation descended from the 19th century Polish refugees living in Polonezkoy – Polish enclave near Istanbul showed a similar tendency: a clearly marked separation

In: The Psychology of Migration

building process, the politics of conferring a sacred status to the nation/state as “a matter of life and death,” and presenting the nation as the principle of collective existence was an indirect way of exercising power over “the life” of society. Martyrdom as a living soci ( et ) al tradition was

In: New Methodological Perspectives in Islamic Studies

understood to motivate societies living in countries with a Muslim majority, regardless of class, gender, ethnicity, state policy, etc. Those zones consist of tribalism, harem (gender) theory and Islam. 6 Since then, as Lara Deeb and Jessica Winegar argue, 7 academic discourse about Islam, especially in

In: New Methodological Perspectives in Islamic Studies

pattern , I refer, as is conventional, to standardized interaction sequences. An institution is then a social pattern that reveals a particular reproduction process.” 20 Similarly, Mahoney and Thelen stress institutions as “relatively enduring features of political and social life (rules, norms and

In: New Methodological Perspectives in Islamic Studies

of death, is motivated by the fear of the loss of power. This loss is a direct result of the loss of contact with, and recognition by, the living. An ancestor's name and remembrance by by the living is his hold on life and continued existence. In this paper I hope to show that the Sisala cosmology

In: Journal of Religion in Africa
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framework to talk about “Living Religious Life on a Broad Canvas: Vatican  II and Sister Mary Alban”. Sister Mary was one of the newly highly educated women religious who came of age after Vatican  II , embracing the possibilities Vatican  II offered for personhood in studying at the University of Toronto

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In: Religion and Gender
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Book Reviews / Journal of Religion in Africa 38 (2008) 343-347 345 Pritchett, James A., Friends for Life, Friends for Death: Cohorts and Consciousness among the Lunda-Ndembu , Charlottesville and London, University of Virginia Press, 2007, 266 pp., 978 0 8139 2624 7, $49.50/£31.95 (hard cover

In: Journal of Religion in Africa
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as retributive agencies to punish moral wrongdoing among living descendants or community members. A second group of spiritual beings responsi- ble for misfortune, however, is not essentially motivated by legitimate moral considerations. We might term these 'malicious' spirits or spiritual beings

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

address social and environmental problems. 3 The Problem Human activities are causing severe environmental damage at an alarming rate. Humanity is on a destructive path that, without rapid efforts to halt it, threatens life on earth. The major problem is that despite the availability of

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

not only motivated by the desire to achieve a higher degree of learning and piety; it was also a Hijra to insure a life in conformity with Islamic principles. Ahmed argues that although colonial rule played a significant role in the move to the Hijaz—where, in the end, these scholars found community

In: Journal of Religion in Africa