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it did the realization of a particular way of life [1; 2; 3; 4; 5] (cf. Sext. Emp. Adv. math. 9,178-180), i.e. living in a way that outsiders might regard strange and even absurd. This was often realized within the philosophical schools - communities in which teachers and pupils had daily contact

in Brill's New Pauly Online

by pastoral considerations and a Biblical standpoint (literary depiction in the Historia Lausiaca of Palladius ). Intermediate forms: communities living the ascetic life without the complete renunciation of possessions. The large number of (male and female) monks alone (said to be

in Brill's New Pauly Online
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rooted in the ancient ethics of virtue ( Justice ). One goal of ancient philosophy was reflection on how to live 'well', i.e. happily. Techniques and exercises for living a good life - which, in 'concern for oneself', encompassed body and soul, 'learning how to die' ( meditatio mortis ) as

in Brill's New Pauly Online

living are out- weighed by the corresponding disadvantages.40 Seneca presents himself as readily resorting to such a process of calculation, in considering whether life continues to be worth living in the face of the physical and mental afflictions of old age (epist. 58.34f.). The term ratio, in the

In: Brill's Companion to Seneca

source for the ancient perception of landscape are poetry and painting . The writers of bucolics ( Theocritus [2] , Vergilius , Longus , Calpurnius [III 3] Siculus , Nemesianus [1] ), for example, reflect the yearning for a simple country life, also interpreted as a reaction to civilization

in Brill's New Pauly Online

. Phdr. 279a). He is not a wise man, nor is he a simple ignorant man, but he is so motivated by his love of sophia that he devotes his life to searching for it. Sophia , which is to be striven for as the highest kind of theoretical knowledge, and as insight into the

in Brill's New Pauly Online

aesthetic consciousness. In the same way the sensual drive of the aesthetic consciousness was focused on life, the formal drive was tied to the aesthetic form. Schiller understood aesthetic consciousness as a whole as referring to the ‘living form’ ( lebende Gestalt ,[25. 542]): Solange wir über seine

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[German version] Stoic philosopher, 2nd cent. BC Inwood, Brad (Toronto) A. Life [German version] Born c. 135 BC in Apamea (Syria

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’s advanced stage of life: he is at an age when poetry is no longer a suitable occupation. Poetry, as something entailing an element of play, ludus, is unsuited to the ‘seriousness’ of the station of life in which the poet finds himself. Poetry is no longer suited to the themes that are of concern to the

In: Brill's Companion to Horace

,” the poet looks down on worldly passions from his place close to the stars (l. 36), living the untroubled and detached life of the ‘easy-living’ gods. Under his eyes the real world blends with the ideal, the geography of ll. 3–28 ranges from Pindar’s Olympia to the Roman forum; from a big Italian

In: Brill's Companion to Horace