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Author: Paula Wapnish

133 mm high in males (ll0 in females) 92 F.S. Bodenheimer (1935) Animal Life in Palestine (Jerusalem: 1935) 460. 9' T.E.Lawlor (1976) Handbook to the Orders and Families of Living Mam- mals (Eureka CA: 1976) 205. 94 Tomilin (1967) 466-515, 523, 574-92. 95 Coffey ( 1971). ESTABLISHING A CONCEPTUAL

In: Methods in the Mediterranean

would be a life-long obsession with building a flying machine that could, without an engine, take him soaring through the skies like a bird (Runkel & Bocklin 1909, 37). Simultaneously with this immersion in frescoes (and flying machines), Bocklin's personality quite suddenly began to assert itself

In: The Impact of Classical Greece on European and National Identities
Author: Susan E. Wood

, the wife of Livia's son Drusus I, and the mother of Germanicus, Claudius and Livilla I, Antonia Minor was a prominent member of the Julian family who figured in the dynastic plans of both Augustus and Tiberius. (See Appendix, Chart no. 4). Unlike Livia, she never enjoyed the status of the living

In: Imperial Women
Author: Adam Gutteridge

(1977) [1658] 267). 2 For a similar treatment of the concept of social space in late antique and Early Medieval Italy, see Harrison (1992) 177–80. W. Bowden, A. Gutteridge, and C. Machado (edd.) Social and Political Life in Late Antiquity (Late Antique Archaeology 3.1 – 2005) (Leiden 2006), pp. 569

In: Social and Political Life in Late Antiquity - Volume 3.1

Roman urban plan down to Late Antiquity, when several decisive changes occurred (fig. 1). 1 Livy, 32.30: in vicos Cenomanorum Brixiamque quod caput gentis erat. W. Bowden, A. Gutteridge, and C. Machado (edd.) Social and Political Life in Late Antiquity (Late Antique Archaeology 3.1 – 2005) (Leiden 2006

In: Social and Political Life in Late Antiquity - Volume 3.1
Author: Susan E. Wood

the deified Augusta appeared with life-sized images of other members of her family, both living and dead-and it is worth noting that the Rusellae group, too, included an image of Claudia Octavia as a child. 174 Whether or not the Copenhagen statue and the Baia sculptures orig- inally appeared

In: Imperial Women
Author: A. C. Smith

chap- ter four, 43-44). The nearly complete absence of biographical data for Attic vase painters, how- ever, prohibits us from concluding that civic per- sonifications in vase painting, for example, were motivated by a partisan spirit. Written sources help us to gauge the political and historical

In: Polis and Personification in Classical Athenian Art
Author: Susan E. Wood

INTRODUCTION A woman living in any city or town m the Roman empire would have known the faces of most members of the ruling family, even if she had never seen them in person. If her daily errands took her through a public forum, she might well see statues of the emperor and several of his

In: Imperial Women
Author: Susan E. Wood

granted to a living person. His mother Antonia Minor thus became the second most important woman in dynastic imagery after the Deified Augusta, with whom she shared the latter title if not the former: she had declined the title "Augusta" while still alive, but Caligula and Claudius conferred it on her

In: Imperial Women
Author: A. C. Smith

marriage: . . . partnerships of both oikoi and clans in living well for the purpose of full and autonomous life; this will not come about unless they live in one and the same place and intermarry. This is the reason why relations by marriage have devel- oped throughout the states, and brotherhoods and

In: Polis and Personification in Classical Athenian Art