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Authors: Celina Proch and Michael Kleu

can identify Paris as a representative of this type of masculinity because of his traditionally female characteristics. For example, his actions are motivated by emo- tions and he acts cowardly in battle. 8 Robert W. Connell, “Arms and the Men: Using the New Research on Masculinity to Understand

Open Access
In: Ancient Worlds in Film and Television

later be con- ceived as a box – also took on a life of their own and found their place in ever new cultural contexts. Having been drawn out from the “plot” (in the Aristotelian sense of μῦθος), these elements formed separate strands of reception that at times interfered with each other and at other

Open Access
In: Ancient Worlds in Film and Television
Author: Koen Vacano

tragic hero because the very success that is his meaning is his undoing”. 40 By asserting himself as an individual above the crowd, by living the American dream if you will, Scarface inevitably creates the enemies that will destroy him. As in Aristotle’s view, the very aspiration for a good outcome is

In: Framing Classical Reception Studies
Author: Koen Vacano

tragic hero because the very success that is his meaning is his undoing”. 40 By asserting himself as an individual above the crowd, by living the American dream if you will, Scarface inevitably creates the enemies that will destroy him. As in Aristotle’s view, the very aspiration for a good outcome is

In: Framing Classical Reception Studies

is, of a rhetorically and literarily productive comparison between different modes of life starting from its compositional framework: work at sea and work on dry land, vs. the city cosmos, inhabited by parasites and courtesans. The social universe represented in the epistolographic collection

In: The Letters of Alciphron
Author: Isobel Hurst

, “When he deals with ordinary matters of life, he almost always shows good sense, and often acuteness. His moral essays constantly remind us of our friend Miss Edgeworth. A pleasant and healthy tone pervades them”. 27 In his essay, “Books”, Emerson observes: Plutarch’s “Morals” is less known, and

In: Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plutarch
Author: N. Richardson

from Helios (1–89). In the central part (90–304) she visits Eleusis, where she eventually orders the people to build her a temple. In the final part, she creates a famine, which deprives the gods of sacrifices, and so brings about the return of her daughter, followed by the restoration of life to the

In: Hymnic Narrative and the Narratology of Greek Hymns
Author: Alexander Lee

endeavour would be like a living death.16 Separate from all the distractions of public life, a man could fol- low the Stoic philosopher in learning much from reading improving works and writing texts of great value to humanity. By the same token, he could emulate Virgil in presenting the countryside as

In: Petrarch and St. Augustine

two of them—the most important series written for children. The first one is the aforementioned series about Alisa Seleznyova called “Alisa” [Alice] or “Priklyucheniya Alisy” [The adventures of Alice].14 The second about the life of a little girl in the twenty-first century written by her father

Open Access
In: Our Mythical Childhood... The Classics and Literature for Children and Young Adults

to give up immortality, the hero makes the challenge of death possible, which is tied to living a meaningful human life. The Voyage-of-the-Argo narrative serves symbolically as a katabasis , a journey to/through a virtual Underworld which contains powers of inversion and chaos, as well as secrets of

In: The Modern Hercules