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' s life we cannot rely on Nicetas; on the basis of the Catecheses, Hausherr's summary may be expanded in the following manner. While, some time after his uncle's death, Symeon "was superintending the household of a certain patrician," he became concerned about his sins and sought for a living

In: St. Symeon: The New Theologian and Spiritual Fatherhood

emergence of a new and triumphant Christian State. Constantine was his means of effecting this change.42 Living the Christian life was to substitute for dying the Christian death. As Wilson aptly put it, “Ideal lives rather than ideal deaths were called for”.43 The change had far reach- ing implications for

In: Historiography in the Middle Ages
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especially those prepared to forsake the world, were driven by an urge that can be more sharply defined, the desire to be assured of salvation. So, in the words of Dorries, the basic question with which every person who entered the monastic life addressed himself to the elder: 7t00C; 0(0900; was a

In: St. Symeon: The New Theologian and Spiritual Fatherhood
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religious life while remaining in the world and a shift from a focus on virginity to that of chastity or continence as the hallmark of sanctity (partly tied to efforts to rehabilitate sex within marriage in response to heretical attacks) soon meant that by the later twelfth and thirteenth centuries, these

in Encyclopedia of Medieval Pilgrimage Online

living reality of the corporeal presence of the saints in their relics, enabling a direct, face-to-face encounter between saint and devotee. This animating effect is augmented by the use of polychromy, giving these saintly images the appearance of life-like flesh. Such visually tangible expressions of

in Encyclopedia of Medieval Pilgrimage Online
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unbridge­ able but on the contrary a place of contact and exchange. Here, at this highest level of value for tribal societies, occurs the transforma­ tion of qualities essential for the continued existence of human life. The living person in these nonmodern societies is therefore totally dependent on

In: Rituals of Power
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unbridge- able but on the contrary a place of contact and exchange. Here, at this highest level of value for tribal societies, occurs the transforma- tion of qualities essential for the continued existence of human life. The living person in these nonmodern societies is therefore totally dependent on

In: Rituals of Power
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Theodoric I of Metz, Guibert, Maclovius, Theodard, Deoderic, King Sigebert, Wicbert, and Lambert, along with com- putational, historical, liturgical, and polemical works. William of Malmesbury (ca. 1095–ca. 1142) wrote a life of St. Wulfstan of Worcester and other saints in addition to histories of the

In: Historiography in the Middle Ages
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Metochites and his overriding determination to get on in life. Also, as the emperor's chief adviser, he presided over a succession of externa l defeats and internal disasters. Prince Theodore thought that a man with some sound military experience, which Meto- chites wholly lacked, might have been a more

In: The Early Palaeologan Renaissance (1261 - c. 1360)
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historical events continuing up to the present, following the old chron- icle tradition of constant compilation. The Life of Aleksandr Nevskiy was adopted into the Moscow chronicles as well, just as it had con- solidated its place in the Novgorodian chronicles a century earlier, divided into yearly accounts

In: The Image of Aleksandr Nevskiy in Medieval Russia