Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 880 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Church History x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Bryan W. Ball

Quakers who thus witnessed latter-day events taking place within themselves were thereby powerfully motivated to the god- ly life. The standard by which that life was measured was high, but if Christ had once lived a sinless life in the flesh it was altogether possible that He should do so again in His

In: A Great Expectation: Eschatological Thought in English Protestantism to 1660
Author: Noel L. Brann

most illustrious products, "Rathbod was not only outstanding in his knowledge of the Scriptures, but also of very excellent character in the comportment of his life." For Rathbod teaching and living were of a unit, so that his own high standards of learned piety were eas ily and naturally transferred

In: The Abbot Trithemius (1462-1516)
Author: Noel L. Brann

timely resignation of the previous abbot Johannes de Kolenhausen, Trithemius furnishes his readers with a brief resume of the life ofJohannes , replacement and namesake to the moment of his assumption of the Sponheim abbacy, Johannes of Trittenheim." Trithemius, as he relates his own story in the third

In: The Abbot Trithemius (1462-1516)
Author: Noel L. Brann

same. In all places great admiration and gratitude is expressed at how Trithemius has enrich­ ed his German soil with Latin , Hebrew, and Greek letters. So exceptional has been his contribution to the literary and cultural life of his homeland that when Gerbel racks his brain to come up with a possible

In: The Abbot Trithemius (1462-1516)
Author: Bryan W. Ball

coming and the subsequent kingdom. In the Puritan ethos the quest for salvation was the pre-eminent issue of life, a drama that was played out, as Professor Haller remarks, in the theatre of each human breast. 140 "Election-vocation-justification-sanctifi- cation-glorification was more than an

In: A Great Expectation: Eschatological Thought in English Protestantism to 1660

his personal decisions were not opposed by prelates who owed their positions to him. The Duke of Burgundy's unswerving support for Eugenius IV was motivated, as was suggested earlier, not only by his opposition to Charles VII of France but also by his disappointment with a number of decisions of

In: Pope Eugenius IV, the Council of Basel and the Secular and Ecclesiastical Authorities in the Empire

ruler but one who was even more motivated by narrow considerations of dynastic political interest. Without a royal pragmatic sanction, the Acceptation remained little more than a statement of expectations as to how the "gravamina of the German nation" ought to be alleviated and of a theoretical

In: Pope Eugenius IV, the Council of Basel and the Secular and Ecclesiastical Authorities in the Empire
Author: Shannon Godlove

West Saxon background living in Mainz, was commissioned by Lull and his colleague, Megingoz, the bishop of Würzburg, to write a vita of Boniface relatively soon after the saint’s death, most likely between 763 and 768. 5 In the Prologue, Willibald tells us that already Boniface’s fame was such

In: A Companion to Boniface

, ensuring they followed a regular life. This process was considered then (and now) to be a process of reform, quite literally “re-forming” monasteries to something like their original adherence to a rule and to an austere way of life. The term “reform”, as well as looking back to a supposedly better time

In: A Companion to the Abbey of Cluny in the Middle Ages
Author: Eileen Sweeney

authentically human existence is a life of struggle and conflict rather than harmony, in which tensions are almost insuperable rather than merely a stage toward unity and harmony with nature and God. But what makes Abelard a humanist is his embrace of and empathy for that fallen and frac- tured humanity

In: A Companion to Medieval Christian Humanism