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Author: Andrejs Plakans

veneration of the historic Latvian farmstead, their rural childhoods, and the virtues said to be present in rural life. 41 As in the US, the years immediately following initial settlement produced among the former DPs a bewildering variety of occupations because having to earn a living was inescapable. For

In: The Reluctant Exiles
Author: Andrejs Plakans

showed a considerable bitterness when he described what he had been doing in Stockholm to earn a living in the years after his arrival in 1944: My [working] life has been excellent … especially in the early years when I was a baggage handler in Stockholm’s main railroad station…. I had already

In: The Reluctant Exiles
Author: Andrejs Plakans

that over the past decades the size of the post-WWII western Latvian population had become even more of a fragment of the tauta than it had been initially, and that the Latvian population of the renewed state – about 1.4 million, living in a democratic political system – had now moved to center

In: The Reluctant Exiles
Author: Robert Carr

with refugee resettlement. A case study on the history of Operation Safe Haven provided parameters for investigating the ways in which generosi- ty is inhibited by nationally contextual and historical perspectives. Generosity was a crucial motivating factor that led to the implementation of Operation

In: Generosity and Refugees: The Kosovars in Exile
Author: Andrejs Plakans

many in the intelligentsia continued to earn a living under the Germans as facilitators of cultural activities in libraries, museums, publishing houses, and newspapers. Control of the life of the mind and of the imagination was for these two regimes one aspect of total control over private lives, and

In: The Reluctant Exiles
Author: Robert Carr

was one of relief and elation, reinforcing the perception that the Australian government had delivered the Kosovars to a new life motivated by a sense of compassionate obligation. Chesterton noted how the refugees regarded Australia as a ‘safe country’ without enemies where they could relax from the

In: Generosity and Refugees: The Kosovars in Exile
Author: Robert Carr

Chapter 3 forced onto over-crowded trains by Serbian police to be taken to the Macedo- nian border.28 Over the next week, life at the border camps was miserable and hopeless, a crossroads between freedom and the horrors of war left behind. Thousands of all ages congregated in an open field at Blace (a

In: Generosity and Refugees: The Kosovars in Exile

useful to the French living there, and defend the Catholic faith’. 25 Like Negri, Dadichi never returned to Syria, but spent the rest of his life travelling in Europe, sometimes employed in the same positions as his compatriot. With the Ottoman Empire increasingly becoming a venue of rivalries between

In: The Power of the Dispersed
Author: Josef Grulich

migration strategies. This study presents a new interpretation of rural migration, arguing that Early Modern rural Czech society was not static but dynamic, contrary to the assumptions of the Czech Marxist research tradition. It argues that mobility was a normal part of everyday life in Early Modern Bohemia

In: Journal of Migration History

1904 [1776]) 111. 31 Urban disamenities are defined as the worse living conditions in pre-twentieth century urban compared to rural areas. Urban areas had worse environmental quality, a shorter life expectancy and higher infant mortality rates (for an overview of studies of England, see for

In: Journal of Migration History