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Author: Anna Papafragou

with, there is an intuitive difference between the phenomenon of classic lexical ambiguity exemplified by port in (5) and the type of meaning multiplicity which characterises the modals; the latter seems to be motivated in a sense which goes well beyond simple ambiguity: (5) This port is justly

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In: Modality: Issues in the Semantics-Pragmatics Interface

heroic myths describing journeys that can be found in various cultures all involve the image schema LIFE IS A JOURNEY. In other words, Gibbs assumes metaphorical transfers as cross-culturally constant processes: he takes the abstract concept JOURNEY, and to a lesser extent LIFE, presumed to underly

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In: Contexts of Metaphor

categories and to give a general verbal explanation for doing so (e.g., the classification of eggplants and kolanuts as food, and motivating this choice by saying something like 'both are food items') are schooling at secondary level and urban, trade-related living. But even these increases are not

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In: Contexts of Metaphor

recognition of metaphors; further, they do not suft1ciently motivate the need for a pragmatic rather than a semantic analysis. In fact, the strongest argument against a pragmatic approach is the fact that the actual interpretation of metaphors is in no clear sense determined by speaker's intentions

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In: Contexts of Metaphor
Author: Joan Cutting

know. Explicitness is partially motivated by S's cooperative intentions, i.e. information presented to enable H to identify the intended referent." She affirms that the quantity of information conveyed in a particular referring term is as important as the relevance of that information. She explains

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In: Analysing the Language of Discourse Communities
Author: Nina Pawlak

rai and hankali, are of great significance in marking the notion. Rai [râi] ‘life’ The basic meaning of rai is ‘life’ (as in masu rai ‘living’, ‘alive’). When used as a subject or an object, the word refers to a person, e.g.: (46) raina ya yi fari ‘I feel happy’ (lit. my life became white) (47

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In: The Body in Language

© koninklijke brill nv, leiden, ���5 | doi ��.��63/9789004��4�48_0�0 CHAPTER 9 Perception of the Living Dead and the Invisible Hand in Teso-Turkana 9.1 Introduction In the border area between Kenya, Uganda, South Sudan and Ethiopia a group of Nilotic languages is spoken which has come to be known

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In: The Leopard's Spots
Author: Leanne Hinton

, until the shift is almost complete. But scholars have been documenting languages for hundreds of years (for some languages, thousands of years), so that some languages that have no speakers left still have enough documentation that it is possible for a motivated person to learn them. I pointed out

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In: The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice

small boy living in the Middle East—of why a single event in life may change our perception of what- ever preceded it and whatever will follow. He then goes on to explain that he got a clear understanding of this kind of relationship between events from music. Referring to a musical example he later

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In: The Body in Language
Author: Mihyon Jeon

participants were asked to write essays on what motivated them to learn Korean in college and on their progress in Korean. These essays further supplemented the interview and participant observation data. Second site: A Community-Based Adult ESL program for Korean American seniors The adult ESL program

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In: Heritage Language Journal