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Language in Life, and a Life in Language: Jacob Mey – A Festschrift Edited by Bruce Fraser and Ken Turner © 2009 by Emerald Group Publishing Limited. All rights reserved. 22 FOOD FOR THOUGHT: CONDUIT VERSUS FOOD METAPHORS FOR COMMUNICATION Masako K. Hiraga 1. INTRODUCTION Reddy (1979) claims that

In: Language in Life, and a Life in Language: Jacob Mey, a Festschrift
Authors: Bruce Fraser and Ken Turner

, her hands (probably clutching a prayer book or a bible) were never fi nished: maybe Pieter didn’t want to emphasize an aspect of his family life that may have troubled him quite a lot while living at home. Perhaps, too, his moving to Paris was an effort to escape from the stifl ing atmosphere of

In: Language in Life, and a Life in Language: Jacob Mey, a Festschrift

doing fieldwork have been facing. As a matter of fact, it’s also something that has been motivating a whole new generation of students to go into linguistics and learn the trade of documenting and describing endangered languages and going out and producing a record that might be of use for the study

In: Ten Lectures on Field Semantics and Semantic Typology
Author: Claudia Caffi

be. Secondly, Goffman's metaphor of everyday life as the staging of a play - a metaphor dating back to baroque writers, Shakespeare and even earlier to the medieval and classical traditions - would seem to have been interpreted too literally. Indeed, the psychological aspects of the interaction have

In: Mitigation
Author: Claudia Caffi

attachment it is also worth mentioning (for a review, cf. Ammaniti and Stem, 1996). Prototypical expectations are anticipatory strategies derived from 'working models' (cf. Bowlby, 1973) based on interactional experiences and instances of failed relational attunement. From the very first stages in the life

In: Mitigation
Author: Thora Tenbrink

to the event described in the subordinate clause. Consequently, the event in the subordinate clause is "taken for granted" to some degree, as it is capable of serving as an anchor for other events (e.g., Talmy, 2000). This observation motivates a pragmatic analysis of these connectives, addressing

In: Lexical Markers of Common Grounds
Author: Paula J. Rose

ideas by connecting the possibility of assistance after death with the merits acquired before dying. Whether the care given to a deceased by his relatives will be useful or not, depends on the way in which the deceased lived his earthly life. Assistance may be useful only for the dead who deserve this

In: A Commentary on Augustine's De cura pro mortuis gerenda
Author: Michael Toolan

is speaking in defence of her son and their way of living : This is a boy who studies the lives of animals, the eating and sleeping habits of animals, animals in their burrows and caves . What is it called , lairs? He is advanced, your honor. I have said from early childhood he liked histories and

In: Contextualized Stylistics
Author: Paula J. Rose

. In addition, in section 16.19–17.21, he discusses a contemporary exception: the care of the martyrs for the living. Augustine is convinced that in exceptional cases the martyrs are given divine permission to communicate with the living. He offers an example derived from his addressee’s own experience

In: A Commentary on Augustine's De cura pro mortuis gerenda
Author: Walter Nash

Walter Nash organs of generation and the rudiments of political feeling. They have a quarrel with life, but their quarrelsomeness is diffuse and curiously confined. They rarely branch out, or vary their themes. One never meets, for example, an injunction to "Kick the Lord Chancellor" , or the allegation

In: Contextualized Stylistics