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Author: Leanne Hinton

, until the shift is almost complete. But scholars have been documenting languages for hundreds of years (for some languages, thousands of years), so that some languages that have no speakers left still have enough documentation that it is possible for a motivated person to learn them. I pointed out

In: The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice
Author: Nancy C. Dorian

unusual, if opportunity of access to the dominant language is present and incentives, especially socioeconomic, motivate a shift to the dominant language. If not, as with India’s former caste system and ascribed status, the result is language maintenance. But given access and incentive, the norm for

In: Small-Language Fates and Prospects
Author: Nancy C. Dorian

for a Western European country (refus- ing birth certificates and identity cards to children with Breton given names, for example, as recently as the 1970 [New York Times 1975]). Yet cultural and linguistic diversity was an unproblematic fact of life in France until the 1790s, when in the aftermath

In: Small-Language Fates and Prospects

life of a people. Furthermore, while the English term "culture" often denotes something that can be separated from life and demonstrated, mauli is seen as something that is a!- ways a part of a person and his or her way of living and also of a group of people and its way of living. In this sense

In: The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice
Author: Leanne Hinton

distinguish them from the non-Indian pop- ulation living in the same region-but those distinctive char- acteristics of English are all that they have left of any lin- guistic heritage they can call their own. (For more informa- tion, see Hutcheson and Wolfram 2000.) A more "liberal" approach to the Native

In: The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice
Author: Leanne Hinton

Within an active society with a thriving language, writing may develop many practical uses, not only for the develop- ment of literature, newspapers, language materials, and so on, but also for the uses of day-to-day life-letters, shopping lists, diaries, advertisements, accounting, recipes, and so on

In: The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice
Author: Nancy C. Dorian

later life, had all been raised in households where Gaelic was the first language and in a social setting where segregation of ESG speakers (residentially, occupa- tionally, in social intercourse, and in marriage) was still largely the norm. They had learned Gaelic first, as children, spoke it either

In: Small-Language Fates and Prospects
Author: Leanne Hinton

community and bringing it back into full use in aU walks of life. This is what has happened with Hebrew. "Revitalization" can also begin with a less extreme state of loss, such as that encountered in Irish or Navajo, which are both still the first language of many children and are used in many homes as

In: The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice
Author: Colleen Cotter

linguistic prac- tices (Gaeltacht-based Raidi6 na Gaeltachta) and the other of which promotes innovative use of language (Dublin-based Raidi6 na Life). The two Irish-language radio stations pro- vide useful, but different, renditions of the potential lan- guage-development practices of a minority language

In: The Green Book of Language Revitalization in Practice
Author: Brian Spooner

pastoral nomadism and a mobile rather than a settled agricultural life. The degree to which language played a role in this process was introduced by Barth (1964). Here I will summarise Barth’s argument and elabo- rate on it from my own experience. 10.3. Balochi as a Criterion of Baloch Identity The

In: Language Policy and Language Conflict in Afghanistan and Its Neighbors