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Author: Robin Sabino

colony’s population. the historical record indicates that negerhollands began to vernacularize about 1688 when survival rates increased for afri- cans living in mixed households. By 1700, they and their descendants had created negerhollands—a new language that encoded the identity of the colony’s new

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Alyson Sewell

labeled ‘incomplete acquisition’2 and ‘attrition,’ which are supposedly tied to patterns of language use throughout a hl speaker’s life, as exemplified by Montrul (2008: 162–163): As the majority language begins to be used more than the home language, some aspects of the heritage language may be

In: Moribund Germanic Heritage Languages in North America
Author: Robin Sabino

, skin, life, live, living, alive’. occurs in the compounds alif (s.) ‘alive’ and liftit (d.), ‘lifetime’. (s)ex. mi a ha en menši,. . . mi frɛn, di regun mi di wɛn a ste ši duku fam bo ši lif liste am nakun, nakun, nakun, nakun. ex. di frou a se am, am lo lo ma di le fo am. ex. an wani am a waku, am a

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Brian Spooner

pastoral nomadism and a mobile rather than a settled agricultural life. The degree to which language played a role in this process was introduced by Barth (1964). Here I will summarise Barth’s argument and elabo- rate on it from my own experience. 10.3. Balochi as a Criterion of Baloch Identity The

In: Language Policy and Language Conflict in Afghanistan and Its Neighbors
Author: Robin Sabino

colonized and exploited territories ranged from noble to ignoble. however, as in modern times, there was a decided preference for the aberrant and the astonishing (hodgen 1964, meek 1976). motivated by curiosity and avarice, and empowered by their developing capacity for ocean travel, renaissance

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Robin Sabino

english also reveals that learners perceived as native-like were also highly motivated. although much less frequently reported in the literature, investment for instrumental purposes (i.e., learning to achieve a goal regardless of one’s feelings about the native speaker community) also leads to

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket

thoroughgoing mod- ernization in almost every single aspect of everyday life with Japan serv- ing as a role model as it had been in the 1880s when Korean reformers fijirst began to study there. Most important of the governmental activities for the linguistic context of this article is the following passage

In: The Idea of Writing
Author: Robin Sabino

Chapter six Deploying linguistiC resourCes in front dog, ‘tis Mr. Dog; behind ‘tis dog. (Virgin islands proverb) 6.0 introduction the world view that motivated european colonial expansion was pow- erful, and restrictions on those they enslaved were enforced with death and life

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: William Fierman

higher than half a decade before) fewer than 17 percent of Kazakhstan’s urban children were being educated in the Kazakh language. True, this represented about half of the Kazakh children living at the time in urban areas. How- ever, approximately 60 percent of the schools where these children

In: Language Policy and Language Conflict in Afghanistan and Its Neighbors

to avoid discrimination by members of the mainstream host society, as is the case of Dominicans on St. Thomas, according to their own accounts, is a related, if possibly a more forceful motivator for social and linguistic change. 2 A Feature of a St. Thomas English Creole in a Variety of

In: When Creole and Spanish Collide