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example of the influence of one language in another to be found in the ancient world’ (Taylor 2002: 328). It was a deliberately chosen translation strategy for evoking the original text lying behind the translations, motivated by the need to produce authoritative Syriac texts that reflected the Greek

In: Code Copying
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colony’s population. the historical record indicates that negerhollands began to vernacularize about 1688 when survival rates increased for afri- cans living in mixed households. By 1700, they and their descendants had created negerhollands—a new language that encoded the identity of the colony’s new

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
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labeled ‘incomplete acquisition’2 and ‘attrition,’ which are supposedly tied to patterns of language use throughout a hl speaker’s life, as exemplified by Montrul (2008: 162–163): As the majority language begins to be used more than the home language, some aspects of the heritage language may be

In: Moribund Germanic Heritage Languages in North America
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trousers, charcoal grey jumper and cashmere jacket, stepped out to greet her. “The only life around here seems to be on the petanque pitch,” said Helen with disappointment as they watched a group of men play boules . “Yes,” agreed Gilles. “Saint-Paul-de-Vence used to be full of artists. You could see

Open Access
In: The Dynamic Lexicon of English
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, the borrowing usually designates “[a] person who attributes a living soul to inanimate objects and natural phenomena” ( OED ), a use which has been documented according to OED since 1866, e.g.: (6) 1997 G. Harvey Listening People, Speaking Earth x. 170 Animists assert that

Open Access
In: The Dynamic Lexicon of English
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pastoral nomadism and a mobile rather than a settled agricultural life. The degree to which language played a role in this process was introduced by Barth (1964). Here I will summarise Barth’s argument and elabo- rate on it from my own experience. 10.3. Balochi as a Criterion of Baloch Identity The

In: Language Policy and Language Conflict in Afghanistan and Its Neighbors
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, skin, life, live, living, alive’. occurs in the compounds alif (s.) ‘alive’ and liftit (d.), ‘lifetime’. (s)ex. mi a ha en menši,. . . mi frɛn, di regun mi di wɛn a ste ši duku fam bo ši lif liste am nakun, nakun, nakun, nakun. ex. di frou a se am, am lo lo ma di le fo am. ex. an wani am a waku, am a

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
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colonized and exploited territories ranged from noble to ignoble. however, as in modern times, there was a decided preference for the aberrant and the astonishing (hodgen 1964, meek 1976). motivated by curiosity and avarice, and empowered by their developing capacity for ocean travel, renaissance

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
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english also reveals that learners perceived as native-like were also highly motivated. although much less frequently reported in the literature, investment for instrumental purposes (i.e., learning to achieve a goal regardless of one’s feelings about the native speaker community) also leads to

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket

thoroughgoing mod- ernization in almost every single aspect of everyday life with Japan serv- ing as a role model as it had been in the 1880s when Korean reformers fijirst began to study there. Most important of the governmental activities for the linguistic context of this article is the following passage

In: The Idea of Writing