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completely different from arabic, e.g. in Figuig, while others are faith- ful copies of arabic patterns, e.g. in a number of libyan varieties. More than other syntactic features, relative constructions show the intricate interplay between contact-induced and internally motivated change. 13.4 General

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In: The Arabic Influence on Northern Berber
Author: Izabela Will

shed more light on recurrent gestures used by other communities living in West Africa due to the fact that semi-conventionalized or conventionalized gestures seem to be a regional phenomenon. For example, most conventionalized facial expressions performed by the speakers of Wolof, a language of Senegal

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In: Recurrent Gestures of Hausa Speakers
Author: Izabela Will

geographical affiliations: Hausa-speaking, Muslim population living in northern Nigeria and the adjacent areas of Niger (Salamone, 2010, p. 8). Hausa is a member of the Chadic language family (a branch of the Afroasiatic super-family) spoken by around 50 millions of people. It is an important vernacular

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In: Recurrent Gestures of Hausa Speakers

Chadic, Frajzyngier 2012), like Pero and Mina, has not grammaticalized the noun corresponding to ‘head’ as a marker coding the point-of-view of the affected subject. As demonstrated in the present section, this fact supports the hypothesis that the grammaticalization of some functions can be motivated by

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In: Embodiment in Cross-Linguistic Studies
Author: Izabela Will

may be verbally expressed with the verb haɗa ‘to join’. A speaker in ex. 5 advices women how to live a marital life. He uses the verb haɗa to refer to the idea of keeping one’s mother and wife under one roof. Although the speaker does not discuss any aspects of their living together, he warns

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In: Recurrent Gestures of Hausa Speakers
Author: Kjersti Larsen

political, economic and technological conditions have affected (im)mobility and, in turn, impacted on this particular life-world. Translocality is seen to encompass different modes of intersecting mobilities, and is thus approached as “an embodied practice either as a way of living a life in different

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In: Translocal Connections across the Indian Ocean

human diversity,” or even “a sense of living beyond the mundane collective boundaries of everyday life.” 70 Merchants and their networks in the western Indian Ocean developed cosmopolitan attitudes underpinned by a legal culture, which was itself part of a translocal “grammar” for mutual understanding

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In: Translocal Connections across the Indian Ocean

marriage, but a highly permeable population whose common factor is cultural in nature … an identity which is neither tribal nor racial but an alternative socio-political structure which is more appropriate for urban living. 1 This is echoed by Horton and Middleton who point out that “the Swahili have many

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In: Translocal Connections across the Indian Ocean
Author: Daniela Moreau

living between the sea and the desert emerges in the images made by Fortier in 1906, as well as a very accurate (probably unintentionally) record of that specific historical moment. I guessed the material would interest him. As we know, one of the many innovative contributions Moraes Farias made to West

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In: Landscapes, Sources and Intellectual Projects of the West African Past
Author: Jan Jansen

and viewed as respectful. A few examples illustrate the griots’ disinterest in formal education of text memorisation: Over a period of sixteen years, I often talked with Lansiné Diabaté (1926–2007) about his work and his life. In that period, he never expressed to me any concern that the Sunjata epic

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In: Landscapes, Sources and Intellectual Projects of the West African Past