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Author: Robin Sabino

colony’s population. the historical record indicates that negerhollands began to vernacularize about 1688 when survival rates increased for afri- cans living in mixed households. By 1700, they and their descendants had created negerhollands—a new language that encoded the identity of the colony’s new

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Robin Sabino

, skin, life, live, living, alive’. occurs in the compounds alif (s.) ‘alive’ and liftit (d.), ‘lifetime’. (s)ex. mi a ha en menši,. . . mi frɛn, di regun mi di wɛn a ste ši duku fam bo ši lif liste am nakun, nakun, nakun, nakun. ex. di frou a se am, am lo lo ma di le fo am. ex. an wani am a waku, am a

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Robin Sabino

colonized and exploited territories ranged from noble to ignoble. however, as in modern times, there was a decided preference for the aberrant and the astonishing (hodgen 1964, meek 1976). motivated by curiosity and avarice, and empowered by their developing capacity for ocean travel, renaissance

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Robin Sabino

english also reveals that learners perceived as native-like were also highly motivated. although much less frequently reported in the literature, investment for instrumental purposes (i.e., learning to achieve a goal regardless of one’s feelings about the native speaker community) also leads to

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Robin Sabino

Chapter six Deploying linguistiC resourCes in front dog, ‘tis Mr. Dog; behind ‘tis dog. (Virgin islands proverb) 6.0 introduction the world view that motivated european colonial expansion was pow- erful, and restrictions on those they enslaved were enforced with death and life

In: Language Contact in the Danish West Indies: Giving Jack His Jacket
Author: Peter Slomanson

) religious and cultural life. Intermarriage and the “Tamil Bias” Living in close proximity and sharing a demanding devotional culture was conducive to intermarriage between the Moors and the Malays, regardless of frequently divergent occupational paths. In the earliest period, a poor ratio of male to female

In: The Genesis of Sri Lanka Malay

longer an authentic expression of the authentic, but only a marketing tool. Here prevails a logic of improvisa- tion based on repetitive (though, sometimes, creative) use of practical formu- las (clichés) and schemes that guide the way in which people cope with the difficulties of everyday life. In the

In: Creolization and Pidginization in Contexts of Postcolonial Diversity
Authors: Richard Price and Sally Price

. Léglise, B. Migge, and P.B. Tjon Sie Fat, eds. 2014. In and Out of Suriname: Language, Mobility and Identity. Leiden: Brill. CRABASI. 2008. Surinam Maroon Tembe: A Means of Living. Paramaribo: CRABASI Foundation. Doat, P., D. Schneegans, and G. Schneegans. 1999. Guyane: L’art Businengé. Grenoble

In: Creolization and Pidginization in Contexts of Postcolonial Diversity

in Senegal’s Lower Casamance. The first paradox pertains to the contrast between cultural homogeneity and linguistic heterogeneity: throughout the area, cultural practices are convergent to a large extent. Where they exhibit differences, these are not motivated by ethnic divisions but by local

In: Creolization and Pidginization in Contexts of Postcolonial Diversity

describe these nom markers as classifiers since they are semantically motivated expressions, originating in nouns, which assign nouns to a specific semantic class: ([+animate, +human] versus [+animate, -human]). Moreover, they are not obligatory, so these only modify nouns when the speaker specifies

In: A Description of Papiamentu