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merely ‘the common names of available natural resources’ (McNeill 1972: 23–24). Similarly, a look at the Pukapuka language of Samoa shows that their four basic colour terms are closely linked to their way of life and their reliance on the talo (taro) as a source of food and, therefore, their colour

In: Colour Terminology in Modern Irish

by people who lived in the pit of illness and hunger. In the novel, abyss is the plight of people trapped in limitless desperation. Chapter 4, ‘A Man and the Abyss’, for example, is an account of a sailor’s outlook on life from the squalor of the slums, which he cannot escape, so he drinks instead

In: The Abyss as a Concept for Cultural Theory

Anthony Kroch plainly states, “Language change is by definition a failure in the transmission across time of linguistic features.” 21 Broadly speaking, this failure comes in two flavors: internally-motivated language change, arising from some inherent feature of the language, and externally-motivated

In: Linguistic and Philological Studies of the Hebrew Bible and its Manuscripts
Author:

spirits that are present in unusual natural phenomena, and that motivate many natural processes. Rather than the mechanistic approach to the physical world that we know through the labors of science, then, preliterate humans saw many inanimate phenomena as living things, an insight that still rings true

Open Access
In: The Dragon and the Rainbow

violence cause people to flee in search of peace and a better life. Notable recent examples are the Syrian and Ukrainian refugees that have flooded into Europe, fleeing the violence in their homelands. It was no different in Israel and Judah. The population of Jerusalem probably doubled during the

In: Linguistic and Philological Studies of the Hebrew Bible and its Manuscripts
Author:

the rainbow on a global scale, highlighting those views that are widely-shared, and hence likely to be motivated by common psychological responses to the natural environment. Because of the complexity of the subject matter, it is divided into four subparts: 1. How the dragon was born, 2. Mysteries of

Open Access
In: The Dragon and the Rainbow
Author:

Serpent of Henham, Newman (1979:190) says “Bures, a town on the Essex-Suffolk border, once experienced harassment by a dragon. Documentary evidence of this particular event is afforded by a chronicle written by John de Hokelowe, a monk living at the period, who transcribed an account of its appearance and

Open Access
In: The Dragon and the Rainbow