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Author: T. Aftab

): 55–70. Muslim women living a life in pardah developed their own idioms and expressions in the Urdu language. With social changes, especially access to new education, this language almost disappeared. However, it tells us a great deal about ‘the way Muslim women lived, thought and felt’ half a

In: Inscribing South Asian Muslim Women
Author: Rauf A. Azhar

, disliked conspic- uous consumption, particularly of the things that would be considered symbols of ostentatious living such as long robes, silk garments, or gold ornaments for men. What that meant was that modesty should be the norm in all spheres of a Muslim’s life, though one is dismayed by the

In: Economics of an Islamic Economy
Author: S. Kuehn

are known either by direct assertion or by implica- tion to be associated with spring shrines.18 Oen the sacred spring or well spirit or numen was an accompaniment of a sacred tree19 or sacred place.20 Sources of life such as wood and water are also considered to be channels of a greater power

In: The Dragon in Medieval East Christian and Islamic Art
Author: T. Aftab

-e-Niswan 1, no. 1 (1994): 21–26. This paper discusses women’s rights as human rights in the Provincially Administered Tribal Areas (PATA) in North Western Pakistan. It begins by giving a brief overview of Riwaj (customary law) relating to various aspects of the life of a Pukhtun tribal woman, thus

In: Inscribing South Asian Muslim Women
Author: T. Aftab

. Karachi, Ferozsons, 1999. 343p. This unique book is a mother-daughter creation. Raihana Hasan has edited and translated into English, the autobiography of her mother Dr. Fatima Shah, describing her early life, marriage, and birth of her children, education, travels, and many more events in the life

In: Inscribing South Asian Muslim Women
Author: S. Kuehn

cultural appropriation was much broader, pervad- ing all modes of life. By the twelh and thirteenth centuries, Islamic culture had fully internalised and synthesised concepts emerging from a mul- titude of scienti c works acquired largely from Graeco-Roman and Indo-Iranian sources. e movement of

In: The Dragon in Medieval East Christian and Islamic Art
Author: Rauf A. Azhar

noted at this stage is that a large part of the criticism of the market mechanism is motivated by the possibility of excessive profits that could be made through market transactions, a possibility that is hardly lost on economics. The Islamic economists, however, have extended the arguments relating

In: Economics of an Islamic Economy
Author: Rauf A. Azhar

CHAPTER ELEVEN SUMMING UP The Basic Issues Contrary to the heavily dirigistic stance taken by Islamic economists, this work clearly shows that an Islamic economy is necessarily a free market economy. Islamic economists’ mistrust of, if not aversion to, market system is primarily motivated by

In: Economics of an Islamic Economy
Author: Wolfgang Behn

, 1977-1990; NatFacDr, 1993-1995 Hale, Sir John Rigby, born in 1923 at Ashford, Kent, he was since 1970 a professor of Italian at University College, London. His writings include England and the Italian Renaissance (1954), and Napoleon; the story of his life (1954). His book, The Civilization of Europe

In: Concise Biographical Companion to Index Islamicus
Author: Rauf A. Azhar

away al-Fustāt in Egypt. The internal economic life of these garrison towns, mostly merchandizing but some long distance trading,2 was of course regulated by the Muslims themselves, and it 2 Recall from Chapter 9 the incident of a loan extended to ʿAbd Allāh ibn ʿUmar and ʿUbayd Allāh ibn ʿUmar by

In: Economics of an Islamic Economy