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revolution is part of the Palestinian revolution and the Palestinian revolution is part of the world revolution".l This awareness guided the path of the Palestinian women in real life, as early as 1925, when Mary Shehadeh, a journalist was quoted saying: "I was extremely interested in the question of

In: Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in Arabic Literature
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revolution is part of the Palestinian revolution and the Palestinian revolution is part of the world revolution".l This awareness guided the path of the Palestinian women in real life, as early as 1925, when Mary Shehadeh, a journalist was quoted saying: "I was extremely interested in the question of

In: Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in Arabic Literature
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the life and works of Arab-American writers is part of a much broader attempt at free exploration into the nature of an intricate process of inter-relationships between creativity and exile. In a previous unpublished work in Arabic, I originally conducted such an inquiry focusing on literary

In: Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in Arabic Literature
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the life and works of Arab-American writers is part of a much broader attempt at free exploration into the nature of an intricate process of inter-relationships between creativity and exile. In a previous unpublished work in Arabic, I originally conducted such an inquiry focusing on literary

In: Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in Arabic Literature
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, if nothing else, a self-image of the poet, even when it deals with other people'slivcs. A collection of poetry in which it is not possible to perceive the poet's character and his "inner life" is not an expression of a "living soul". 6 Further, the poet who fails to display the peculiari­ ties of his

In: Four Egyptian Literary Critics

Patricia Waugh, manifests so much self-reflexivity that it bothers upholders of theory at large.5 The ques- tion raised against indulgence in self-reflexivity or "narcissistic narra- tives," as Linda Hutcheon terms the art,6 amounts to a critique of its lack of commitment to life, its possible co

In: The Postcolonial Arabic Novel
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his longing coincided with an admiration for French literature, acquired during his stay in France. He was thus motivated to try and write a short story which would convey his memories of home. The short story which he had planned swelled, in the process of writing, into an eighty thousand word

In: The Changing Rhythm

Salim Barakat's use of the fantastic is couched in realistic detail and dialogic interventions that make it a locus for the real itself. It inhabits Kurdish life and memory and redirects attention to a culture of great richness. \Vritten in flow- ing classical Arabic, and capturing the shades of

In: The Postcolonial Arabic Novel
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-Islamic period, or jiihiliyya), we find that already a number of women poets had risen to prominence. They were primarily celebrated for their skill in composing elegies for the dead. Most famous of these, certainly, was the latejiihiliyya poetess al-Khansa' of the BanD. Sulaym tribe (living just north of

In: Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in Arabic Literature
Author:

-Islamic period, or jiihiliyya), we find that already a number of women poets had risen to prominence. They were primarily celebrated for their skill in composing elegies for the dead. Most famous of these, certainly, was the latejiihiliyya poetess al-Khansa' of the BanD. Sulaym tribe (living just north of

In: Tradition, Modernity, and Postmodernity in Arabic Literature