Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All

However, the low cost of access means that any active and motivated participant within a network, however defined, can directly and freely (at least initially, until the feedback strikes) take the initiative to enter the communications processes which in various ways constitute the essence of the network

Full Access
In: Muslim Networks and Transnational Communities in and across Europe
Author: Mark LeVine

modern are- nas of social life. Such cultural politics is generating ‘new Muslim lifestyles and subjectivities’ in the global era.183 Paradoxically, motivating this politics is the belief that in a global 179 Mohamed Arkoun, ‘Islam et laïcité: un dialogue-conflit en évolution?’ in Bistolfi and Zabbal

Full Access
In: Muslim Networks and Transnational Communities in and across Europe
Author: Yitzhak Shichor

as a stepping stone and a junction to other destinations. According to Uygur associations in Turkey, more than 300,000 Uygurs have been living in Turkey since fleeing their homeland in the last few decades, an unlikely yet indicative figure.9 8 On the limited access to the Internet in Central Asia

Full Access
In: Muslim Networks and Transnational Communities in and across Europe

have been this situation of crisis and threat that motivated the creation of Köprülü 01589, as a way to conserve the city’s cultural resources in duplicate, and this situation could also explain why the manuscript left Shiraz early in its existence (on which, see below). 8 The manuscript is deserving

Full Access
In: Cities of Medieval Iran
Author: Sarah Albrecht

-ḥarb , consider it an undesirable or even theoretically illicit abode for Muslims. They argue that living a life in accordance with Islamic norms and values is in principle incompatible with the legal, political, and social situation in Western countries. Consequently, they also hold that taking citizenship in

Full Access
In: Dār al-Islām Revisited
Author: Yaron Friedman

ḥawza or a ḥusayniyya (religious seminary and congregation place for ceremonies) in Palestine, which means that Fāṭimid authorities were careful not to impose Shīʿī customs in Palestine, which seems to have had a Sunnī majority. We lack information on the daily life of the medieval Shīʿī communities

Full Access
In: The Shīʿīs in Palestine

. Home clearly included a lived attachment to a particular physical place. Since the 1970s, both archaeologists and anthropologists have been interested in land, or land and its features, landscape, as an area of study. Land can “convey the specific traces of… material life as generations of

Full Access
In: Grounded Identities
Author: Sarah Albrecht

played a role in both justifying and refuting calls for mass migration. Rashīd Riḍā on Living under Non-Muslim Rule The territorial status of colonized lands and its implications for Muslims living under colonial rule have also been a matter of great concern to a prominent Islamic reformer, the Syrian

Full Access
In: Dār al-Islām Revisited
Author: Sarah Albrecht

dār al-islām , or were they obliged to emigrate to Islamic territory? How far were Muslims subject to the shariʿa while living in non-Muslim lands, and what were their obligations vis-à-vis the non-Muslim jurisdiction under which they lived? In an attempt to trace the beginnings of the Islamic legal

Full Access
In: Dār al-Islām Revisited
Author: István Zimonyi

Turkic-speaking Bashkirs inherited the former name of theMagyars living east of theVolga and theMagyar group remaining in theoldhabitatmergedwith the Bashkirs after theMongol invasion.27 Ligeti brought forth an intermediate solu- tion using a new etymology, according to which the original form wasmajghir

Full Access
In: Muslim Sources on the Magyars in the Second Half of the 9th Century