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Author: A.L. Crone

life—over thirty-fi ve—there has not been one whose problem was not that of fi nding a religious outlook. It is safe to say that every one of them fell ill because he had lost that which living religions of every age have given their followers and none of them has been haled who did not recover his

In: Eros and Creativity in Russian Religious Renewal
Author: A.L. Crone

- phy (reason, the mind) and science (empirical life experience) would be integrated, but, in Kireevsky’s theory with Faith, not Rea- son, as the dominating integrative force. (4) A sense of history: the “meaning of human life can be discovered only as the human spirit reveals itself in history.” Th

In: Eros and Creativity in Russian Religious Renewal

Evgeniia Kir- ichenko in her 1991 monograph on Russian design, appreciated that spirit of historically informed creative reconstruction that motivated Viollet-le-Duc: What was most valued in a restoration project (as in a new building) was not scholarly accuracy in relation to the original but an

In: Visualizing Russia
Author: A.L. Crone

. Th is may, of course, be explained by the immensity of the Russian ter- ritory” (VI, 463). Having compared Tiutchev to an untapped natural resource, (a spiritual one), he goes on to stress that his main value lay in his conviction of the life, vitality of nature, that “Nature is a living organ- ism

In: Eros and Creativity in Russian Religious Renewal
Author: Marina Mogilner

of the 1860s combined imperial “archaic” features with a multitude of new forms of political, social, and cultural life. Much in Russian history in gen- eral, and in the postreform period in particular, can be interpreted as attempts to fi nd answers to the same challenges as those experienced by

In: Empire Speaks Out
Author: A. Savchenko

Vilno as a Belarusian city. Demographically, it never had a substantial plurality of ethnically Belarusian population. Before 1939, the intellectual life of the city was dominated by its Polish and Jewish communities. Economically, the presence of Belarusians was neg- ligible. Political power was in

In: Belarus - A Perpetual Borderland
Author: A. Savchenko

, ruled by a strongly authoritar- ian regime, it is the government that decides to keep old symbols or introduce new ones. While this is true, Belarusians do not seem to mind the conspicuous saturation of their life with old Soviet symbols. Aft er the Lukashenka government decided to restore the Soviet

In: Belarus - A Perpetual Borderland
Author: Esther Levinger

, for example, prefigured life in a future paradise of free people living in a free land. 20 The deurbanized city would have actualized the poetist quest: overcoming the divide between town and country and between manual and intellectual labor. In the foreword to Ladislav Žák’s book Obytná krajina

In: Constructivism in Central Europe
Author: Jim Samson

) and of the European Union (2007). Reform did follow EU accession (though many injustices still remain hidden from view), but one effect of the accession was to accelerate the flow of emigration, as people sought to escape a world where living standards were low, where opportunities for advancement

In: Music in the Balkans
Author: Jim Samson

Greek musical life. But it is significant that the major funding for this project derived not from the Greek Government but from the onassis Foundation, which is also at this moment planning to develop a new Cultural Centre for arts and literature. the tradition of sponsorship from wealthy Greeks

In: Music in the Balkans