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public aff airs 14 Responsibilities in relation to the rights of persons to their culture, religious practice and language 15 Responsibilities in relation to the right to just and favourable conditions of work 16 Responsibilities in relation to the right to a fair wage and decent living 17

In: The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

Codes mentioning the right Th e right to a family life (marriage, maternity and children) + prohibition of exploitative child labour 100 100 100 Th e rights of the child 100 100 100 Non-discrimination 100 100 100 Th e equal rights of men and women 100 100 100 Th e right to form and join trade

In: The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

on how the identities and interests of in- dividual actors, such as corporate entities or state representatives, are in fact socially constructed in international life.15 Such construction, he theorises, occurs through 11 UN Doc. A/HRC/8/5, p. 3. 12 Ibid. Such gaps “provide the permissive

In: The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

national, ethnic, racial, or religious group, as such: a. killing members of the group; b. causing serious bodily harm to members of the group; 1 Lemkin’s life story was described by Samantha Power in her book, A Problem from Hell (2002). See also the special issue of the Journal of Genocide Research

In: International Crimes and Other Gross Human Rights Violations

perpetrator. Euphe- misms are often used to support this. A human being may not be killed but a cockroach may be trampled on. People may not be gassed but life unworthy of living may be ended.12 A quote from another Greek torturer, Petros Goros, illustrates a typical example of denial of injury: ‘The title

In: International Crimes and Other Gross Human Rights Violations

children. (quoted by Osiel 2001, 163) Involvement in the dirty war was service to re-establish a democratic style of life in Argentina. (Verbitsky 1995, 163) The soldiers followed their orders, and their crimes can thus be qualified as crimes of obedience. Alfredo Astiz is one of the perpetrators who

In: International Crimes and Other Gross Human Rights Violations

in the lorries, in the lecture halls and during the lessons . . . I thought of asking to be transferred from ESA, but I realized that it was as much as my life was worth . . . I beat prisoners to save myself . . . Living in that atmosphere I got ill, and one Sunday evening I had a haemorrhage

In: International Crimes and Other Gross Human Rights Violations

Chapter Four right to life, the right to a fair trial, and the right to be protected from inhu- man and degrading treatment or punishment. Everyone was entitled to these rights, even the underprivileged and the poor. The rich and powerful had to respect these rights. Beccaria, one of the most

In: International Crimes and Other Gross Human Rights Violations

scars which may never heal. Jean Améry, a torture victim himself stated that whoever has suffered torture stays tortured for the rest of his or her life. The extreme fear and anger aroused by the torturers becomes a living night- mare for the victims. Having been utterly helpless and at the complete

In: International Crimes and Other Gross Human Rights Violations

representation closer to the ‘truth’ than other forms of communication because it so accurately and directly approxi- mates life. In this way, it gives the viewer access to the truth in ways a written news article or sketched picture cannot, but is still a highly motivating and iconic symbol capable of moving

In: The Yearbook of Polar Law Online