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Porphyry that Augustine views as contradictory. One of them is the Epistula ad Anebontem and the other is unnamed. It would be incorrect, however, to limit the charge of contradiction merely to the two writings which are adduced as proof, rather it is a charge against the pagan Platonist life in general

In: Augustine and Porphyry
Author: Ben Jones

its work as “Christ-centred”: We base our values on Jesus’ words and deeds. His life empowers and motivates us. We wish to take part in the social responsibility given to His Church. We believe that clarity regarding our values is a precondition for developing mutual respect and tolerance in our

In: Pentecostalism in Africa
Author: Andreas Heuser

lengthy report in the Nigerian national newspaper “The Guardian” (September 25, 2013) juxtaposed a Pente- costal practical vision of good governance with the “Nigerian nightmare” of every-day life. The report described the conditions of living in “Redemption City,” a town-like headquarter of the

In: Pentecostalism in Africa

Christian Leaders’8 where the invited elite were served a nice meal; listened to witnesses from successful businessmen, academ- ics, and pastors; and were entertained by eFv’s group of musicians, Living Faith Music. the theme of the evening was ‘Construct a dream in order to succeed in life and in

In: Pentecostalism, Globalisation, and Islam in Northern Cameroon

savior and become born again is a deciding moment of rupture, which figures prominently in tes- timonies of salvation—more often than not structured in terms of a dualism between before and after this moment—and is continuously reenacted in ritual life (Robbins 2004, Lindhardt 2009a, 2010). Breaking

In: Pentecostalism in Africa

as well as in the present study of pen- tecostalism in order to be able to describe what motivates social action and engineering in the everyday life of the new pentecostal communities. Early African Pentecostalism after several encounters between africans and european explorers and traders during

In: Pentecostalism, Globalisation, and Islam in Northern Cameroon

was taking place as the ancient tribal reli­ gions were brought face to face with a militant Islam on the one hand and a highly­motivated Christian missionary movement on the other, following in the wake of the encroaching and often brutally aggressive colonizers. Africa had neither nation

In: Pentecostalism in Africa

/c in Africa, not just as a system of beliefs, meanings and symbols by use of which individual adherents organize experience and make sense of the world around them but as a multifaceted social and cultural force that has shaped societal life in significant ways, evidence that African pc/c has come

In: Pentecostalism in Africa

resources. For this reason, ostentatious presentations of wealth are frequently a norm among big men, and fanciful titles (i.e. President for Life or King at the national level, and Chief, Alhaji, or Chairman in other contexts) are embraced by both parties in the patron-client exchange (Daloz 2003). On

In: Pentecostalism in Africa

author. 8 Burton gives the date for his conversion as 3/8/1905, but in his recording (n.d., side one), he says it was on 18/8/1905. 9 For a detailed presentation of the period of Burton’s life when he was attached to the pmu see the series of 3 papers published in Journal of European Pentecostal

In: Pentecostalism in Africa