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human existence in a field of tension between life and spirit. Cassirer understands such a form of metaphysics as a synthesis of the preceding analyses of the objective expressive forms (the symbolic forms), which is to fall under the concept of life and that of a living subjectivity

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate
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beings is seen as a self-motivating and self-transcending movement. The mode of being of this movement, the human being’s form of life, is called “existence” or “ecstatic temporality” (Cf. Heidegger, 1986, §§ 45–83). So far so good, when it comes to the common ground between Cassirer and

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate

, it merges with its corresponding element. 4.2 prāṇa and Other Vital Powers Breath being a principal attribute of life, living beings may be referred to by the participle prāṇat -, “breathing.” 59 The wish is expressed that the prāṇa should remain in oneself, 60 and that it should

In: Soul and Self in Vedic India
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. Advancing a critical ideal of form requires more than the elaboration of an abstract concept. When we ask what this concept of form is about, the answer is straightforward and can be contextualised within the intellectual horizon of their time: it is the form of life, or the living form. Building upon a new

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate

human beings, or what he calls the “eudaemonistic impulse” ( kōfukushugiteki keikō 幸福主義的傾向), that which arises internally but then connects with the material world through affective relationships in order to create a place where people are actually living the good life (Curley, 2017, p. 130). Toward

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate

outside his own philosophical path. 2 As for Nishida, his encounter with Kantian philosophy was motivated by his wish to go deeper into methodological questions and refine his instruments of critical analysis. 3 This stage of his work is documented by a series of essays written over the years

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate

suggest possibilities for philosophy on a global scale as well. This is suggestive if we take into consideration Nishida’s connections not only to Neo-Kantianism and Lebensphilosophie (philosophy of life) as well as Husserlian phenomenology. In this regard, an important figure, easy to miss, is Emil

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate

. Finiteness plays a central role in Heidegger’s conception. Heidegger puts the “thrownness” (German: Geworfenheit) of the human being—as in being thrown into the struggle of life without any choice—, and the fact that the human being has a passive participation in the culture in the foreground. In particular

In: Kyoto in Davos. Intercultural Readings of the Cassirer-Heidegger Debate
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familiar and paradigmatic example of gongfu, its core meaning is the art of life in general, including efforts, methods, and cultivated and embodied methods of living well. Ni makes the case that instead of taking the human subject for granted as rational choice makers, gongfu takes ethics as mainly a

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In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
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, and how death will deprive us of such values.12 This might very well be true and it may function to motivate a sense of seriousness about using one’s time and resources well, but what is understood here is not death itself but the loss of life. Such a claim also supposes that the condition of death

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy