Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 362 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Continental Philosophy x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Christian Beyer

on this realistic assumption are to be systematically bracketed in a “phenomenological epoché”. The idea behind this is the following: “The life accomplishing the world-validity of natural world-life cannot be studied in the attitude of natural world-life.” (Hua X, 345) For, as Husserl says

In: Constructive Engagement of Analytic and Continental Approaches in Philosophy
Author: Mario Wenning

his day, good life. He approached the Western border of the kingdom of Zhou where he encountered Yin Xi (尹喜), who was the ancient version of a customs and border control officer. Yin Xi asked Lao Zi to pay his dues. Since the sage was not an affluent man and did not possess anything dispensable

In: Constructive Engagement of Analytic and Continental Approaches in Philosophy
Author: Ned Dobos

later in life.31 Thus even where a soldier’s life is not in grave danger, he may be exposed to the kind of psychological damage that would render him incapable of living a flourishing life upon returning from duty. This brings us to an important question. If participating in a humanitarian

In: Just War Theory

multiplicity and the richness of our experiences. Language serves us as interpreter for observing the living facts which constitute our experience, which, without it, we would tend to overlook. . . . This means that language illumines for us the complexity of life. (Cited in Spiegelberg 1981, 84) According

In: Constructive Engagement of Analytic and Continental Approaches in Philosophy
Author: Eric Reitan

child in order to get a victim to unlock a safe). (4) is characteris- tic of many if not most wars (consider the goal of ‘regime change’ that motivated the Iraq war). (5) is probably not uncommon of military acts in the early stages of a revolutionary war, and can also be observed in certain acts of

In: Just War Theory
Author: Paul Cobben

the notion of ‘life’ to elucidate this intermediate step, which is meant to explain why observing subjects are motivated to take up a stance of ‘Desire.’ this notion consequently occupies a key position in its argumentation, for otherwise we would not be capable of understanding the transition

In: The Paradigm of Recognition

that we wanted to argue that “the other is the essence of my existence.” It was an actual, a real introduction ( Figure 1 ). Figure 1 Attempt 1 Such was our first introduction. An attempt to argue about altruism being the essence of human reality. In the beginning, we were motivated to

In: Altruism or the Other as the Essence of Existence

as bare life, animalistic life voicing itself, and bios as living being with logos as politicized language, a qualified life or political existence. But this conceptual difference comes from a decision to start the genealogical analysis from Plato and Aristotle. The “inclusion of zoe in the

In: Altruism or the Other as the Essence of Existence

1 Introduction 1 When I do something intentionally, I am often, if not always, motivated by something: I have a motive for my action. This makes the notion of motivation an important part of our everyday understanding of others and ourselves. In the tradition of phenomenology, motivation and its

In: Phenomenology and Experience

connected with endeavor (Streben)— with instinctive wishes and willing—and which originally motivate and provide a route for both fantasy and perception. Husserl already shows in his lecture on ethics (1908/09) that the felt value-attitudes are understood as a unique type of reasonable constitu- tion of

In: Investigating Subjectivity