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Author: Martin Stone

University Press, 1995). tween moral value and social fact–a gap figured by Milton as the rela- tion between God and man.4 The project of Paradise Lost–“to justifie the ways of God to men”–is motivated by a sense of the apparent fail- ure of God, and hence implies the need for human speech and judg- ment to

In: Law: Metaphysics, Meaning, and Objectivity
Author: Martin Stone

properties: first, it is fit- ted to be a regress-stopper, bringing to an end the reference from text to text;37 second, it is (thereby) able to infuse life B the power to mean B into those inert bits of textual matter. God fits this bill, for these are His traditional powers. Replacing Him with us (but

In: Law: Metaphysics, Meaning, and Objectivity
Author: Brian E. Butler

Ready-Made World’, Synthese 51 (1982), pp. 141–68. 8  CIS, p. 189. 9  CIS, p. 73. generally questionable or even discredited.7 For them, as well as Rorty, we are left living in a world where theories and appeals to truths of a techni- cally ‘realistic’ or ‘empirical’ nature are highly questionable as

In: Law and Legal Theory
Author: Steven V. Hicks

international law begin to function as a moral force in promoting international harmony, cooperation, dialogue, and justice. International law derives its legitimate "rational" (vernunftig) authority to rule from the living actuality (Wirklichkeit) of international life-from the nexus of institutions and com

In: International Law and the Possibility of a Just World Order

denounces then what makes it deserved is ‘malice aforethought’, that one be blameworthy or morally cul- pable for the action. Now Hurd might accept that in a citizen’s private life wrongdoing does—or can in the right circumstances—call for condemnation (from appropriately interested parties). But she can

In: Law and Legal Theory

organs) is to discover their sustaining functions and what these can explain about life. 29 Life is, according to Aristotle, not a predicate of things, but things manifest life, each in its own life. It is an inward determinateness – autonomy – of living things by which they cannot be defined or

In: Hans Kelsen and the Natural Law Tradition
Author: Steven V. Hicks

to living in a republic and obeying its laws are gradually becoming civilized enough, and morally sensitive enough, to regard war as unacceptable. Likewise, given the threat that war poses to life and livelihood, representatives 74 HEGEL AND COSMOPOLITANISM of republican states will certainly be

In: International Law and the Possibility of a Just World Order
Author: Sean Coyle

inserting these redundancies or metaphors in it. There is no perspective from which these inflated and decorated claims can have a sense different from their sense uninflated and undecorated, and that is the sense they have in ordinary legal life’. It is, ultimately, ‘not a metaphysical but a legal

In: Law and Legal Theory
Author: Matt Matravers

* This paper was first given at a conference on punishment at Newcastle organized by Thom Brooks. I am grateful to Thom both for the invitation and for his comments on the paper. I am also grateful to Antony Duff and to the other participants for their searching comments. ‘WHO’S STILL STANDING

In: Law and Legal Theory

sight of the fact that it is also terrible to be the victim of a serious crime. The harms such crimes inflict include loss of life, significant loss of physical or psychological function, loss of dignity, and the loss or destruction of property on which individu- als depend for their future welfare

In: Law and Legal Theory