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Author: Jos de Mul

should not only think of the social credit system, but also of the present biopolitical state terror against the Uyghur population in the Xinjiang Province), Neo-Darwinism has become a biopolitical project, more or less intentionally aiming at a transformation of human life in the direction of trans- and

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In: Philosophische Anthropologie als interdisziplinäre Praxis
Author: Keith Peterson

environment of human children from birth, then to pass over the ontogenetic, proximate developmental context of human life and instead reach back to a distant evolutionary past or employ a culturalist worldview idealism in order to explain or motivate behavior is misleading. An ecological materialist view

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In: Philosophische Anthropologie als interdisziplinäre Praxis

manifestation of life and, though it might have a function, it does not owe its origins to the pursuit of a specific aim. My aim in what follows is twofold. First, I will examine four main tenets which, in my reading, constitute the basis for the phenomenological view: a) the phenomenon of the lived body as

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In: Philosophische Anthropologie als interdisziplinäre Praxis
Author: Eli Kramer

counts as serious and legitimate modes of philosophical-literary genres has greatly weakened professional philosophy’s ability to offer aesthetic, pedagogical, psychagogical, and ethical support for robust and enriched cultural life. 30 A few books, like Socrates Tenured: The Institutions of 21st

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In: Intercultural Modes of Philosophy, Volume One
Author: Eli Kramer

. Michel de Montaigne, 12 June 1580. 77 Certainly, the skeptics meant to develop a mode of life, and to incite their fellows to this mode of living. Montaigne is no exception, despite his strategic protest in the Essays . That said, the reforms they proposed were largely private and individualized

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In: Intercultural Modes of Philosophy, Volume One

things, but living things “ make their appearance ” in self-display. 11 Humans specifically, though, neither specifically appear nor display, but present themselves through active, conscious choices of showing themselves. As a result, self-presentation “is open to hypocrisy and pretense.” 12

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In: Modern and Postmodern Crises of Symbolic Structures

bodily experience which finds its core analysis in the connections of motivations and directedness. Phenomenology makes a return or reversion ( Abbau ) to the basic structure of the living present ( lebendige Gegenwart ), and by means of this it gets to the original stream of the life of subjectivity, to

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In: Modern and Postmodern Crises of Symbolic Structures
Author: Peter Šajda

uncontrolled and unchecked manner. (3) The environment in which leveling unfolds unimpeded is the public . This indeterminate collective is not a real community, but rather it is an anonymous abstraction which flourishes when community life is in decay. Although the public does not constitute a space in

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In: Modern and Postmodern Crises of Symbolic Structures
Author: Frank Perlin

progressive accumulation of variations by the individual [de l’individu]; it is, so to speak, a moment in the evolution of life [l’évolution vitale] that acts to differentiate living beings through increasingly distanciating them the ones from the others… … a description which already seems to distinguish

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In: City Intelligible
Author: Juhana Toivanen

’s argument is that bestiality simpliciter refers only to the empirical fact that one does not have anything to do with other people. It refers to a way of life. So, if one is bestial simpliciter —bestial without qualification, living in complete solitude—he is by definition not political. This much is

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In: The Political Animal in Medieval Philosophy