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, know his course in life. 27 LE SURVIVANT (1963): CONTINGENCY AND WHOLENESS In Le Survivant, the reader is plunged into a world where notions of death and separation are fleshed out, objectified, and analyzed in an attempt to discover whether or not an individual is capable of living independently

In: Andrée Chedid
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menaced by the intrigues in the house. It does not occur to her that the others see her as a threat; she expects only the dowry and with it the chance to become middle class, even though her nature seems to call her to a more earthy life than the repressed one she is living. Despite her dowdy

In: Françoise Mallet-Joris
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-and-blood relationship between language and self, a relationship from which we might make several observations. First, if blood is to be understood as the life-giving force for the body, then words are the sine qua non of all perceptions of the world. The effort to perceive the world succeeds only to the extent that the

In: Palimpsests of the Real in Recent French Poetry
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one’s nose on the tablecloth (47-52). By the mid-seventeenth-century, polite manners had become the hallmark of FLS, Vol. XXXIII, 2006 34 a French courtly elite living under an absolutist regime. Yet, the his- torical and textual evidence accumulated by Elias was intended to sketch out a

In: Civilization in French and Francophone Literature
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aroused to any new response, any mobilizing elan or appetite for life. One of the living dead, he walks in a spiritual wilderness, dessicated by tedium, while those around, fawning courtiers comprehending nothing, try one key after another to unlock his affective tomb. The first line of the present

In: Baudelaire's Poetic Patterns
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one day she and Patrick will divorce. Helga's life confirms Catherine's suspicion that inherited wealth is the enemy of spontaneity, and she cannot imagine living as Patrick's family would want her to. This is a sad story with a sad ending. The central story, "Le Musee," may represent both a

In: Françoise Mallet-Joris
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-misses abounds in plays and novels of the time, and all kinds of languages and explanatory schemes have been invoked to describe and explain the taboo's permanence in human life. The present essay describes a way of reading Le Fils nature[ that uses discourses deriving from anthropology, which studies

In: Perceptions of Values
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’s selfish inattention, as paternal neglect allows him to continue in his plantlike state, unassimilated to the dusty hardware that fills his father’s store. The decision to send Sébastien to a famous Jesuit school is motivated by father Roch’s desire to experience the imaginary glory of proxy

In: The Nothing Machine
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the Centre de Documentation Raymond Queneau, Verviers . 44 Chapter two Although line 202 lends itself to a teleological reading, it is not clear, from the rest of the passage, that the appearance of life is a step forward. Like the soup in which they appear, the first living things are unappealing

In: Poetry and Cosmogony
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, defective work of art, a fragile envelope in which life is enclosed for a season before reverting to its original status as “[un] petit tas de fumier, [une] menue 8 Ibid., p. 479. 9 Montaubin, Marie-Françoise. “Les Romans d’Octave Mirbeau: Des livres où il

In: The Nothing Machine