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Author: Hellmut Ritter

-level,' he scrawls."2 Wilson Har- ris has acknowledged (in conversation) an address to himself in the persona portrayed in that opening section. As he often reminds us, he worked for the first part of his professional life as a hydrographic surveyor in Guyana, and while he is not the only Guyanese surveyor

In: Theatre of the Arts

perspective of the loss of life-narratives puts the focus on the search for identity, meaning, and value. In the search for values, religion often plays an important role – not religion as a simplistic answer to all life’s problems, but as a source of meaning. When I emphasize the potential role of

In: Trauma, Memory, and Narrative in the Contemporary South African Novel
Author: Nicoline Timmer

’s hyperactive self-consciousness does not undermine his sense of self but rather creates a sense of self for him, albeit not a stable and secure sense of self. Dave is living his life while at the same time showing it, as if he constantly has something to prove – to you, to others, but again, most likely

In: Do You Feel It Too?

, that, for most people, are so difficult they stick in the throat for embarrassment.” “All life is a bridge, I told him.” Samuel Delany. “Atlantis: Model 1924” Introduction Scholars of literary theory and cultural history have considered the modernist project to be an artistic effort to reorder the

In: Modernism, Postmodernism, and the Short Story in English
Author: Nicoline Timmer

specifications of what Wittgenstein referred to as alife-form’. This concept, of a life-form or form of life, Wittgenstein used to stress that the way we talk, use language, is dependent on our way of living.60 We should always understand that ‘the speaking of language is part of an activity, or of a life

In: Do You Feel It Too?

nature (universal, life-oriented, repetitive), or, finally, as (3) subjective/mental time (experience, memory, expanded connections between past, present, future; duration, giving a person identity; fusion of subject and object in the moment of being, revelation or vision, anticipation of death

In: From Modernism to Postmodernism
Author: Nicoline Timmer

Narrative Psychological Approach 59 account for this turn to the human, is motivated (at least in large part) by the novels themselves.19 To further specify, my interest lies with the analysis of the presentation of being human in fiction; so not (I think it is important to note) simply with a

In: Do You Feel It Too?
Author: Hellmut Ritter

rooted in events one knows to ha ve occurred even as it breaks the Void that im- prisons one to create new pacts within lapses of memory within onself when one revisits the past. Such strange lapses - that seem deeper than common-or-garden lapses - are motivated perhaps by a mystical crumbling of the

In: Theatre of the Arts

of life, in thoughts and feelings, and thus provides a basic ambiguity, which in some ways is not so disssimilar to the ambiguities of the modern novel. The response is what Toni Morrison in Song of Solomon called “a deep concern for and about human relationships” (150). As a character in

In: From Modernism to Postmodernism
Author: Nicoline Timmer

further explained when I discuss the second symptom. Although these novels at times still ‘ironize’ and ‘caricaturize’ a popular postmodern culture just like postmodernist fiction did,5 they seem to do so with less disdain, with less distance. (Eggers’s mixed feelings about joining a popular real life

In: Do You Feel It Too?