Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 82 items for :

  • All: Living a Motivated Life x
  • Gender Studies x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Author: Una McIlvenna

betraying an uncontrollable sexuality. This suggests that artistic patronage could be problematic for courtly women: writers who depended on their favour in order to make a living would sing their praises but could live a literary ‘double life,’ simultaneously penning anonymous polemical literature

In: The Politics of Female Households: Ladies-in-waiting across Early Modern Europe
Author: Gianna Zocco

city as a place ‘for a living out of counter-normative, creative identities.’ 18 Maurice Blanchot, for example, thought of Berlin as ‘not only Berlin, but also the symbol of the division of the world, and even more: a ‘point in the universe’, the place where reflection on the both necessary and

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research

with the depiction of one’s own life is as old as literature itself and was already consciously used in the Middle Ages. 1 In France especially, the ‘autobiography in the form of a novel’ has remained a decisive trend in the literary world up until today, although certain dissenting voices who favour

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Susan Broomhall

that confirmed that irrational women were ill-fit for public life. A further element of her representation of mourning for Henri built upon the construction Catherine had made as Henri’s foremost partner, of which, as explored in Chapter 2, the queen mother gained more control during the reigns of her

In: The Identities of Catherine de' Medici
Author: Annette Simonis

care seems to have been an early impulse and motivation, which led Hughes from wildlife-watching to poetry-writing and became a life-long commitment. 17 The author himself has acknowledged the key role of the animal in his writings by turning it into a poetical metaphor. In his crucial essay Poetry

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Werner Wolf

appear to almost ‘spring to life’ – all of these recipients do not confuse real life with a representation (an artifice or fictio ). Nor do they, as a rule, confuse reality with an imagined world (a fictum ), 2 for they know that they are holding a book in their hands, that they are watching a film

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research

and the reconstruction of collective identities. 3 Re-Writing European Identity: Péter Hunčík, Határeset (Borderline Case) The debut novel Határeset (Borderline Case, 2008) by psychiatrist Péter Hunčík, a Hungarian-minority author living in Slovakia and writing in Hungarian, can be called a

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Sandra Vlasta

or because life abroad is cheaper than at home.) This kind of English tourists irritate Lewald: ‘Diese Engländer sind eine Plage in allen Hotels der Schweiz und Italiens.’ (119, These English are a nuisance in all hotels in Switzerland and in Italy.) Furthermore, they are a disturbance to the

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Elina Pyy

choice of words: she is after all, Pompey’s only wife, yet she seems to take particular pride in being the only woman to have followed him. Most probably, the notion is intended to draw attention to Cornelia’s performance as a woman in a sphere of life that is otherwise entirely masculine. Per undas

In: Women and War in Roman Epic
Author: Elina Pyy

other’ and to explain away the ‘evil’ in human nature as something that is characteristic of that other. Although the Argonautica finds Medea at an early stage of her life, the darkness of her psyche is constantly implied, as if to emphasise that it is an innate part of her being as a barbaric witch

In: Women and War in Roman Epic