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Author: Gianna Zocco

city as a place ‘for a living out of counter-normative, creative identities.’ 18 Maurice Blanchot, for example, thought of Berlin as ‘not only Berlin, but also the symbol of the division of the world, and even more: a ‘point in the universe’, the place where reflection on the both necessary and

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research

with the depiction of one’s own life is as old as literature itself and was already consciously used in the Middle Ages. 1 In France especially, the ‘autobiography in the form of a novel’ has remained a decisive trend in the literary world up until today, although certain dissenting voices who favour

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Annette Simonis

care seems to have been an early impulse and motivation, which led Hughes from wildlife-watching to poetry-writing and became a life-long commitment. 17 The author himself has acknowledged the key role of the animal in his writings by turning it into a poetical metaphor. In his crucial essay Poetry

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Werner Wolf

appear to almost ‘spring to life’ – all of these recipients do not confuse real life with a representation (an artifice or fictio ). Nor do they, as a rule, confuse reality with an imagined world (a fictum ), 2 for they know that they are holding a book in their hands, that they are watching a film

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research

and the reconstruction of collective identities. 3 Re-Writing European Identity: Péter Hunčík, Határeset (Borderline Case) The debut novel Határeset (Borderline Case, 2008) by psychiatrist Péter Hunčík, a Hungarian-minority author living in Slovakia and writing in Hungarian, can be called a

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Sandra Vlasta

or because life abroad is cheaper than at home.) This kind of English tourists irritate Lewald: ‘Diese Engländer sind eine Plage in allen Hotels der Schweiz und Italiens.’ (119, These English are a nuisance in all hotels in Switzerland and in Italy.) Furthermore, they are a disturbance to the

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research

‘reformed prelate’ 23 certainly worked for the Counterreformation 24 but he did so based on a rigorous interpretation of Augustine’s doctrine of grace (in the spirit of the ‘Catholic Reformist’, Hubert Jedin), not on the politically motivated, overwhelming aesthetics of the ‘propaganda fidei’. 2 The

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Kujtim Rrahmani

. Pierre-François Biancolelli, Agnès de Chaillot 1 Life Is Elsewhere Life is elsewhere. Yes, this sounds like a very old literary and social formula. Home also seems to follow this lifeline. Life is hidden in time: in a time that is elsewhere , missing , or home . What is the time

In: Reconsidering (Post-)Yugoslav Time
Author: Ruben Borg

able to tell them apart—original from copy, living from life-like. The third thesis in particular strikes a familiar cord. As must be obvious to any reader of posthuman myths, narratives about robots, clones or cyborgs, the thematic exploration and dramatisation of tragic passions is an all but

In: Fantasies of Self-Mourning
Author: Rose France

fact that Iuliia sees life in her home town as a living death (her version of the ‘abyss’) is conveyed by her dream that night. She sees an open coffin being brought to the door of the house and banged against the door. The knocking turns out to be somebody at the door with a telegram from her husband

In: Tolstoi and the Evolution of His Artistic World