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farm.” 11 This was the Pent Farm, rented by Ford and sublet to Conrad in the fall of 1898. It was a place that Conrad enjoyed immensely and that provided him with exactly the atmosphere and climate needed to keep in check the gout which plagued him throughout his life. It was a quiet place, not

In: Joseph Conrad and Ford Madox Ford

year’s leave of absence from his life in order to seek an appropriate application for his abilities” ( Musil 1996 , i , 44). What is the reason for this change of heart? It is a horse, more precisely a “racehorse of genius”: when he reads “a statement that in the meantime a racehorse has become a

In: Modernism beyond the Human
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Life,” the editors brought about in 2003 yet another turn of the Christian Century , now with the motto, “ Thinking Critically, Living Faithfully. ” 2 This phrase invokes 2 Timothy 2.11 (“It is a faithful saying: For if we be dead with him, we shall also live with him,” King James Bible ) and

In: Modernity and the Periodical Press

balanced by an animalization of the human character, thus creating a common ground which allows the author to posit a non-anthropocentric view of life. Pirandello plays with the features of what is culturally perceived as a zoological hierarchy, which places humans above animals. Within this framework, I

In: Modernism beyond the Human
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within culture and by political forces. The conceit here is unexpected: this is a descent from an idea of God to an idea of ordinary life. It occurs when God’s once-dominant aides are seen to return (in the five aphoristic sentences) as individuals who now abandon being ‘rank toadies of the Almighty

In: Aphoristic Modernity

or little against Marcel Proust as a person, but he did have something against a number of aspects in his work. He de- tested Proust’s rationally explicative psychological considerations and was averse to his fascination for the decadent Paris Belle Epoque sa- lon life. For instance, Breton in turn

In: Avant-Garde and Criticism
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of the so-called Lost Generation can therefore be characterized as queer in that it opposes a “reproductive temporality” which “create[s] longevity as the most desirable future, applaud[s] the pursuit of long life (under any circumstances), and pathologize[s] modes of living that show little or no

In: White Male Disability in Modernist Literature

were motivated by a redemptive impulse based on a sense of moral superiority and national responsibility” ( Burton 1994 , 61). British imperial feminism contains a tension between Humanist civilising impulses, and feminist attempts to challenge Humanist assumptions of “self-reflexive reason

In: Modernism beyond the Human
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ignorance being invoked in the examples that follow, a wilful or else willed ignorance which relates more to life-knowledge (experience) than to book-knowledge (erudition). These characters consider themselves not just unschooled but unworldly, unsophisticated, artless. They find themselves at sea among

In: Aphoristic Modernity
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Jean Stein” 272 In 1956, as well as throughout his life and career, William Faulkner spoke of his novel The Sound and the Fury in a highly emotional yet ambiguous manner. Initially unsuccessful following its publication in 1929, his fourth novel later became one of the author’s most acclaimed and

In: White Male Disability in Modernist Literature