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Author: Stan van Hooft

moral source motivating me to an ethical stance toward others? In this chapter I will explore what the relation might be between being a person and having a right to life. And I will add that being a person implies having responsibilities. But 1 will not use the terminology typical of the bioethics

In: Life, Death, and Subjectivity
Author: Stan van Hooft

Five LIFE AS A MORAL SOURCE The basic principle of ethics, that principle which is a necessity of thought, which has a definite content, which is engaged in constant living, and practical dispute with reality, is: Devotion to life resulting from reverence for life. Albert Schweitzer1 The

In: Life, Death, and Subjectivity

meaningful and worthwhile lives. Hitler, for example, would have a meaningful and, possibly, subjectively worthwhil e life, but not an objectively worthwhile life. The thresh- old for meaningfulness is set by considering what a life not worth living might be: a life with no or unachievable goals . But

In: What is the Meaning of Human Life?
Author: Stan van Hooft

attitude to life and our sense of the obligations to which it might give rise will be a function of the metaphysical views that we hold about it. The mere fact that there is life on this planet is a ''moral source" for us, in the sense that it can inspire ethical attitudes toward living things. It is

In: Life, Death, and Subjectivity
Author: Tobias Hainz

can now analyze the hedonist's stance towards life A and life B. 3.1.2 The Case 0/ the Amount Hedonist At first glance, question and answer seem to be trivial and obvious, respec- tively. The amount hedonist would, of course, prefer living life B over living life A for the obvious reason that a

In: Radical Life Extension
Author: Philip J. Walsh

broad range of eon- seious life through his coneept of motivation. Motivating contents press on us to varying degrees toward that wbieh they motivate, binding analytically distinct mental acts into experiential wholes in virtue of a felt-belongingness. The motiva- tion relation itself does not

In: The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl

turn, the art of good living has engaged with aesthetics in seeking a stable foothold in the face of decomposition of codified ethical systems. All these tendencies are expressed in the pragmatist concept of action with experience framed as a certain point in it. Art ceases to be an object of aesthetic

In: Beauty, Responsibility, and Power
Author: Stan van Hooft

. For the ancient Greeks, the concept of the soul referred to the principle of life that every living body contained. It was the basis of those vital functions that mark off a living thing from a dead or inert one. Being a principle of life, it was inconceivable for Socrates that such a principle

In: Life, Death, and Subjectivity
Author: Stan van Hooft

. There is no object in the world that answers to the nominative description "life." The concrete object that would be in question in any particular case of "life" is a living organism. The science of biology, even as it describes itself as studying "life,'' is actually studying living organisms and