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discourse identifying a settled life with civilization, as belonging to the collective of the inhabitants of the Protectorate. The article begins by reminding readers that for two years the regulation banning living on the road has been in force in the Protectorate. That is followed by mentioning JUDr

Open Access
In: Roma Portraits in History
Author: Ieva Tihovska

cannot call myself a nomad. I started living a sedentary life around the age of ten. I became drawn to studying and started going to school. Unfortunately, circumstances didn’t allow me to graduate. I read a lot, tried to replenish my knowledge, learn as much as possible about the history of my people

Open Access
In: Roma Portraits in History

revolutionary, coming from a mixed marriage (his father was Roma, his mother was a majority Finn), who passed away in 1919 and whose literary work showcases his broad socialist ideals, connected to the struggles of marginalised communities. His life and work, while not often connected to the Roma movement in

Open Access
In: Roma Portraits in History
Author: Beata Halicka

6.1 First Steps in the USA – an Immigrant Making a Living In several regards, the journey across the ocean was a breakthrough event in the life of Tony Kruszewski. The many years of attempting to secure a US visa, which eventually ended in success, opened up the door to emigrating to the

In: Borderlands Biography
Author: Beata Halicka

circle the globe in their jet aircraft between one lecture and the next. In order to off-set the burden of living directly alongside the neighbouring airbase, the Kruszewskis frequently took trips to Montreal: There was a rich cultural life in Montreal. We went to concerts, the opera and the

In: Borderlands Biography

flows of ideas and goods.” 27 Particularly in Serbia, Jansen writes, “the contrast between current visa restrictions and the previous freedom to cross borders with the Yugoslav passport structured many narratives of loss in everyday life.” 28 The memory involved a “mourning” for “living normally,” or

In: The Media of Memory

flows of ideas and goods.” 27 Particularly in Serbia, Jansen writes, “the contrast between current visa restrictions and the previous freedom to cross borders with the Yugoslav passport structured many narratives of loss in everyday life.” 28 The memory involved a “mourning” for “living normally,” or

In: The Media of Memory

economic situation of women. This part also looks at the social life and sociability experienced by women through consumption and travel. It shows how women and their relationships structured the social and political life of a household, underlining how female friendships contributed to the advancement of

Open Access
In: Changing Subjects, Moving Objects

The Constitutional Court adjudicated in 1999 that the erasure had no basis in law, and that it was not an innocent case of a “legislative mistake.” Those who researched the phenomenon often argue that the erasure was rather motivated by an ethno-national conception of the Slovenian state, in which the

In: The Media of Memory

The Constitutional Court adjudicated in 1999 that the erasure had no basis in law, and that it was not an innocent case of a “legislative mistake.” Those who researched the phenomenon often argue that the erasure was rather motivated by an ethno-national conception of the Slovenian state, in which the

In: The Media of Memory