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. While decorum might not have prevented Rembrandt from using his common-law wife, who his contemporaries referred to as living with him ‘ in Hoererij ’, like a whore, as a model for drawing from life in the studio, or from portraying her—recognizably her—(partially) nude as a historical figure, such as

In: Ut pictura amor

dynastically motivated but affectionate union of a sovereign and his consort) as well as pictorial and cultural conventions for conjugal love in the early modern Netherlands and Britain. The complex union of marriage partners, a bond with social as well as personal consequences, has never been reducible simply

In: Ut pictura amor

In the earliest known painting of the subject by Aertsen, dated 1552, a still life consisting mainly of food but including references to other worldly concerns (keys, a money purse, and legal documents) dominates the foreground; in the background, Mary sits at Christ’s feet and Martha stands before

In: Ut pictura amor
Author: Michael Zell

French original and a Dutch translation. Marot implores his lady to avert her eyes from the mirror and find her perfect beauty mirrored most faithfully in his adoring heart: […] there is no mirror, which will be, or ever was That can show perfectly Your living beauty: But […] If your eyes

In: Ut pictura amor

been motivated differently. 52 Cf. Marino, La Galeria i 34: ‘[S]ì di senso lo stupor mi priva, / ch’io son quasi la statua ella par viva’. Seeing a painted Massacre of the Innocents , Marino, in ibid., i 58, marvels how the painter’s artifice brings the children to life, only for them to be

In: Ut pictura amor

. Painting, states Alberti in Book 2, ‘possesses a truly divine power in that not only does it make the absent present (as they say of friendship), but it also represents the dead to the living many centuries later, so that they are recognized by spectators with pleasure and deep admiration for the artist

In: Ut pictura amor