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Author: Erin Schoneveld

- ulation of personality as the artist’s “life force” (seimeikan), claiming that “the stroke of the artist’s brush is like an extension of his nervous system . . . every stroke represents the artist . . . [for Cézanne] it is a matter of rhythm when creating art.”19 Yamawaki felt that “personality” was

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

a legacy.1 This re- positioning was likewise refl ected in the content of the Shirakaba magazine, which, while continuing to concentrate on the status and the life of the artist, began to place more emphasis on “educating” the Japanese public about Western art. The magazine’s shifting focus was

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

will be open to the public and anyone who donated more than 1 yen will be considered a life-long member of the museum.61 By motivating the Japanese public to buy into the “exclusive” group of art patrons, the Shirakaba group hoped to galvanize popular support that went beyond their own artistic

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

Japanese public. At its height of popularity it was estimated that one in every ten people living in the Tokyo metropolitan area had visited a Bunten exhibition.11 This positive public response was re- fl ected in many newspaper and magazine articles, as in one reviewer’s remarks in Bijutsu shinpō (Art

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism
Author: Erin Schoneveld

through living life to the fullest extent despite per- sonal hardship and adversity.68 His impression of Van Gogh, at least theoretically, was as an artist who, “only painted what was concrete and true to the Self.”69 For Kishida this represented a purely subjective and profoundly personal expression

In: Shirakaba and Japanese Modernism