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Author: DOMINICA DIPIO

, “Beyond Unicentricity: Transcultural Black Presences,” Research in African Literatures 30.2 (Summer 1999): 96–109. 8 Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o, The River Between (1965; Nairobi: East African Publishers, 2011): 20. Further page references are in the main text. 90 D O M I N I C A DI P I O  the leader

In: Transculturation and Aesthetics
Author: Eric Gobetti

’Europa verso la catastrofe (Milano: Mondadori, 1947), pp. 645–657. Galeazzo Ciano, Ciano’s Diplomatic Papers (London: Odhams Press Limited, 1948) ed. Malcolm Muggeridge, trans. Stuart Hood). 17the Italian Occupation of Yugoslavia (1941–43) at the end of March.9 Then Italian East Africa collapsed; Asmara and

In: Italy and the Second World War

for visits, all with the goal of showing them the “achievements” brought by the regime to the Patria.3 Consent for the regime was quite widespread, to the extent that around 4,000 Italians went to East Africa from abroad to fight in the Italian army during the invasion of Ethiopia in 1935.4 Yet

In: Italy and the Second World War
Writers of Indian origin seldom appear in the South African literary landscape, although the participation of Indian South Africans in the anti-apartheid struggle was anything but insignificant. The collective experiences of violence and the plea for reconciliation that punctuate the rhythms of post-apartheid South Africa delineate a national script in which ethnic, class, and gender affiliations coalesce and patterns of connectedness between diverse communities are forged. Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing brings the experience of South African Indians to the fore, demonstrating how their search for identity is an integral part of the national scene’s project of connectedness. By exploring how ‘Indianness’ is articulated in the South African national script through the works of contemporary South African Indian writers, such as Aziz Hassim, Ahmed Essop, Farida Karodia, Achmat Dangor, Shamim Sarif, Ronnie Govender, Rubendra Govender, Neelan Govender, Tholsi Mudly, Ashwin Singh, and Imraan Coovadia, along with the prison memoirists Dr Goonam and Fatima Meer, the book offers a theoretical model of South–South subjectivities that is deeply rooted in the Indian Ocean world and its cosmopolitanisms. Relations and Networks demonstrates convincingly the permeability of identity that is the marker of the Indian Ocean space, a space defined by ‘relations and networks’ established within and beyond ethnic, class, and gender categories.


CONTRIBUTORS
Isabel Alonso–Breto, M.J. Daymond, Felicity Hand, Salvador Faura, Farhad Khoyratty, Esther Pujolràs–Noguer, J. Coplen Rose, Modhumita Roy, Lindy Stiebel, Juan Miguel Zarandona
Translator: Joep Lameer
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.
The present English translation reproduces the original German of Carl Brockelmann’s Geschichte der Arabischen Litteratur (GAL) as accurately as possible. In the interest of user-friendliness the following emendations have been made in the translation: Personal names are written out in full, except b. for ibn; Brockelmann’s transliteration of Arabic has been adapted to comply with modern standards for English-language publications; modern English equivalents are given for place names, e.g. Damascus, Cairo, Jerusalem, etc.; several erroneous dates have been corrected, and the page references to the two German editions have been retained in the margin, except in the Supplement volumes, where new references to the first two English volumes have been inserted.

Occult sciences 474 Chapter 5. Oman, East Africa, and Abyssinia 475 A Oman 475 B East Africa 476 C Abyssinia 476 Chapter 6. Iran and Tūrān 477 1 Poetry and Belles Lettres 477 1b Philology 477 2 Ḥadīth 477 3 Shīʿī fiqh and kalām 479 4 Sciences of the Qurʾān 479 5 Mysticism 480 6 Philosophy 480 8

In: History of the Arabic Written Tradition Volume 2

total, a becoming instead of a being that is mediated by a new Being-with-others, since we are individuals only in social relations with others. Thus, the taxonomic impositions can be said to have backfired. As James Ocita argues, comparing East Africa to South Africa: where Africanisation programmes in

In: Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing
Author: Shamil Jeppie

translations of Shakespeare into his native Tswana language. 3 Plaatje has been extensively studied but he is just one of a generation of black African men of letters. Anglophone West and East Africa—just to stick to the Anglo sphere of colonial rule and education—also have its mission-school educated elites

In: Philological Encounters
Author: Felicity Hand

. Govinden Devarakshanam Betty . A Time of Memory: Reflections on Recent South African Writings ( Durban : Solo Collective , 2008 ). Hand Felicity . “ Impossible Burdens: East African Asian Women’s Memoirs ,” Research in African Literatures 42 . 3 ( Fall 2011 ): 100 – 116 . Hassim Aziz . The Lotus

In: Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing