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context and paving the way for an exploration of their encounter with European culture. He was among the first scholars in the 1970s and 1980s to explore the Nahḍa (cultural renaissance) that took place in the Arab Middle East during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Nahḍa was an

In: Cultural Pearls from the East: In Memory of Shmuel Moreh (1932-2017)
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, Jonathan G. "The Situated Critic or the Loyal Critic? Rorty and Waltzer on Social Criticism." Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (1998): 25-46. Allen, Jonathan G. "Rationality, Relativism, and Rorty." South African Journal of Philosophy 11 (1992): 52-61. Rorty dismisses the claim that he is a

In: Richard Rorty

November 2017 ]. McCarthy , J. 2018 . “ Harlem is everywhere .” Project Muse , 65 , 2 : 6 – 13 . DOI: 10.1353/dss.2018.0022 . Mavhunga , C. C. 2017 . “ Introduction .” In What do science, technology, and innovation mean from Africa? , edited by C. C. Mavhunga , 1 – 27 . Cambridge, MA

Open Access
In: African Futures
Religion, Geography and Postcolonial Literatures
Volume Editors: and
Interweaving the interpretative methods of religious studies, literary criticism and cultural geography, the essays in this volume focus on issues associated with the representation of place and space in the writing and reading of the postcolonial. The collection charts the ways in which contemporary writers extend and deepen our awareness of the ambiguities of economic, social and political relations implicated in “sacred space” - the sense of spiritual significance associated with those concrete locations in which adherents of different religious traditions, past and present, maintain a ritual sense of the sanctity of life and its cycles. Part I, “Land, Religion and Literature after Britain,” explores how postcolonial writers dramatize the contested processes of colonization, resistance and decolonization by which lands and landscapes may be viewed as now sacred, now desacralized, now resacralized. Part II, “Sacred Landscapes and Postcoloniality across International Literatures,” draws upon postcolonial theory to inquire into how contemporary fiction, drama and poetry represent themes of divine dispensation, dispossession and reclamation in regions as diverse as Haiti, Israel, Bosnia-Herzegovina, the Arctic, and the North American frontier. A critical “Afterword” considers the implications of such multi-disciplinary approaches to postcolonial literatures for present and future research in the field. Writers discussed in the essays include Russell Banks; James K. Baxter; Ursula Bethell; Erna Brodber; Marcus Clarke; Allen Curnow; Edwidge Danticat; Mak Dizdar; Sara Jeannette Duncan; Zee Edgell; “Grey Owl”; Haruki Murakami; Seamus Heaney; Peter Høeg; Hugh Hood; Janette Turner Hospital; James Houston; Dany Laferrière; B. Kojo Laing; Lee Kok Liang; K.S. Maniam; Mudrooroo; R.K. Narayan; Ngugi wa Thiong'o; Ben Okri; Chava Pinchas-Cohen; Mary Prince; Nancy Prince; Nayantara Sahgal; Ken Saro-Wiwa; Ibrahim Tahir; Amos Tutuola; W.D. Valgardson; Derek Walcott; and Rudy Wiebe. Maps accompany almost every essay.

Introduction “Gay Free Zone”: in February 2011 street stickers appeared in the East London areas of Tower Hamlets and Hackney which condemned the ‘sins’ of homosexuality and warned of ‘Allah’s punishment’ (Roberts 2011). There was a universal outrage in the London press and media, not to mention in

In: Resistance and the City

particular historical contexts. The determining factor that stands above the others is the Cold War context – which is worth recalling more than a quarter of a century after the fall of the Iron Curtain. From 1945 to 1989, Europe was divided between West and East, that is, between two economies, political

In: Beat Literature in a Divided Europe

) 2 From 1719 until 1820, chattel slaves were imported into Louisiana, mostly directly from West Africa (“listed as brut in French or bozal in Spanish”), but also from French and Spanish colonies in the Caribbean. (Louisiana Slave Database 2000) Further, Brasseaux lists some of the numerous

Open Access
In: Centers and Peripheries in Romance Language Literatures in the Americas and Africa
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-changing differences where each time a new element appears the whole of the ‘commons’ itself re-con- figures. (Sarat Maharaj. Fatal Natalities in Faultlines. Africa Pavilion. Venice Biennale 2003 and the network of Raqs Media Collective.New Delhi. 2002) 0022 This shows up the limits of the ‘plane of tolerance

In: Artistic Research