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Author: Ying Zhang

play in the interconnected worlds of religion and the arts in early modern China, the main topic of this small volume. My discussion of the Ming prison as an example of a creative environment and its elite prisoners as creative subjects will serve to introduce interdisciplinary scholarship on premodern

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts
In: Discourses of Anger in the Early Modern Period
Author: Thomas Barrie

spaces and polychromed light. Chinese Buddhists identify four sacred mountains as the dwelling places of bodhisattvas ; Taoists five holy abodes of suprahuman immortals. Fifth, there are cosmological places that replicate or reflect the cosmic order of the world. Hindu Temples serve both cosmogonic

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts
Author: Eric Ziolkowski

distinct lexeme available in any particular non-western “religion” under study: the mandarin term jiao in China (e.g., Yu 2005, 22–24; cf. Ni 2015, 152–53, 175); the Sanskrit, dharm , in South Asia (e.g., Alles 2013); the Arabic word dīn in Islam (e.g., Khatami 2010, 61); and so forth

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts
Author: Urmila Mohan

has developed both in India and abroad, and devotees have come to expect this even as they anticipate thematic changes according to the ritual calendar. Figure 2 Detail of embroidered Chinese peacock on a deity’s skirt. Mayapur, 2012. Image by Author As an example of ISKCON style, let us consider

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts

religion, especially as the history of religions, surfaced in the German university system and within a generation throughout Europe and the United States. Supported, especially on the popular level, by a series of events from the artistic fascination with and Christian missions into China and Japan, the

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts

what practitioners themselves believe. As the title suggests, the focus of Bellah’s book is the earliest known forms of human civilization. Bellah spreads his attention across tribal societies, archaic societies, and the four great civilizations of the Axial Age – ancient Israel, Greece, China, and

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts
Author: Lieke Wijnia

longer spiritual foundation. Maroon culture in Suriname, sacred geometry in the Islamic world, calligraphy in China, and Aboriginal visual languages in Australia, Canada, and the United States all refuse to be understood from a binary distinction between religion and the secular. A postsecular approach

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts

hurled at someone from the outside. Early Protestants often accused Catholics of idolatry. Later, Protestant missionaries accused people in Africa, India, China, and other places of committing idolatry because they interacted with gods, ancestors, and spirits using images. For the alleged “idolaters

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts