Search Results

the Romanesque languages, both regarded the former as an inferior copy and adaptation of the latter, the true Roman art which was seen as perfect and timeless. This idea was immediately widely accepted. Further dissemination of this understanding came in 1824, when Arcisse de Caumont (1801

In: Romanesque Renaissance
Author: Stephan Hoppe

their courtly elites, developed a new urge to use references to antiquity for their arguments and thus to assign specific functions to humanist cultural innovation. The efforts to reform church and empire became an essential catalyst for the reception and adaptation of the ideas of Italian humanism. The

In: Romanesque Renaissance
Author: Thomas Barrie

architecture may be productively understood as expressive of the adaptations of Mahayana Buddhism in the context of the indigenous religions of Korean Shamanism and Japanese Shinto, both of which remain culturally significant. There are particular congruencies in Japan, where Shinto had established specific

In: Architecture of the World’s Major Religions
Author: Kersti Markus

from St. Mary’s, the church of merchants and crusaders, were engaged in the construction work – obviously, there is no reason to talk about conflicts between different patrons in Visby during that period. However, the most intriguing question concerns the spatial change. Why was adaptation of the

In: Visual Culture and Politics in the Baltic Sea Region, 1100-1250
Author: Rana Habibi

adaptation and translation of imported modernity and formulate the indigenous version. This process of enculturation, as Randolf David explains, designates the conscious and selective adoption of vernacular and indigenous elements from the local culture in order to lend a touch of familiarity to something

In: Modern Middle-Class Housing in Tehran
Author: Rana Habibi

Iranian taste, in fact, became the adaptation of a mixture of imagined worlds: the peer-neighbor images of the ideal house (Turkey, Egypt), the exported imagination of the American lifestyle, and the global modern movement, as shown in architectural journals and the media. Consequently, the multitude of

In: Modern Middle-Class Housing in Tehran
Author: Rana Habibi

processes of indigenous adaptation, transforms one’s environment. Newer practices thus serve as models that are imported and are more or less adapted to local needs and conditions. 2 As we have seen in previous chapters, the formation process for modern neighborhoods in Tehran implies local and

In: Modern Middle-Class Housing in Tehran

be as affordable as other materials currently on the market. Traditional handmade mud brick construction is inexpensive, but requires many modifications in order to withstand moisture and to meet contemporary codes and standards. One modern adaptation of mud brick is the compressed earth block ( CEB

In: Earthen Architecture in Muslim Cultures

them. The builders used local materials and (contrary to popular belief that associates the use of earth in architecture with poverty) its use results from a population’s adaptation to its environment. 51 There is a regional specificity in southeastern Algeria: the Mzāb, the Miya, and the Rīgh are

In: Earthen Architecture in Muslim Cultures
Author: Rana Habibi

landowners learned to interact and work with each other and others through negotiation. This negotiation resulted in a novel type of housing: an adaptation of modernist vocabulary by way of vernacular miʿmārs . However, Nārmak remains an example of incomplete modernization. Housing reformers couldn’t always

In: Modern Middle-Class Housing in Tehran