Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 115 items for :

  • All: "belief" x
  • Brill | Rodopi x
  • Art History x
  • Literature and Cultural Studies x
  • Chapters/Articles x
Clear All Modify Search

Series:

Garrett P.J. Epp

Abstract

While the Wycliffite Tretise of Miraclis Pleyinge famously condemns religious theatre as sinful idleness and ‘signs without deed,’ biblical drama has the potential to be highly productive, as a form of performative theology. Much like the meditative mode of affective piety, likewise common in the later Middle Ages, when undertaken seriously by or for those who believe in what it represents, the performance of biblical drama can create rather than merely represent theological meaning. This paper examines a variety of texts and performances, medieval and modern, in order to demonstrate how religious belief and theatrical make-believe can intertwine.


Series:

Mireille Rosello

Abstract

Ismaël Ferrouhki’s Le Grand Voyage follows a father and a son who leave Aix-en-Provence to drive to Mecca together. The emphasis on religion, migration, generational and cultural or national differences invites us to place the film within a recognizable French cinematographic tradition: at first sight, Le Grand Voyage could be one of those “beur” or “banlieue” films, whose focus on the lives of migrants from formerly colonized territories in North Africa have gradually imposed a familiar aesthetic grammar. I argue, however, that Ferroukhi breaks with those well-known genres and experiments with a new type of migratory aesthetics. His Babelized road movie does not represent Islam as the other’s exotic religion, an unknown set of dogmas that is either feared or treated as a block of alterity. In Le Grand Voyage both protagonists are Muslims, but the film shows that religion is both what they have in common and what creates divisions between them. What matters is not so much the representation of Islam or even the notion that Islam is multiple, as the way in which each character relates to his own religious beliefs.

This new point of view is constructed by the film’s treatment of geography and language. Although the father and the son travel together, their journeys are radically different. The film reflects on this disconnection by simultaneously producing two different superposed cinematographic maps of Europe, and by demonstrating that each character adopts a unique way of communicating with the strangers that they meet on the way.

Series:

Justyna Włodarczyk

above shows how the discourse of breed is also a typically modern discourse of belief in technological progress, science, and anthropocentrism: it is an apology for humans’ fascination with their own power, additionally augmented by modern scientific discoveries. This rhetoric of improvement continued

Series:

Mark McGahon

burial, it would be impolitic (and contrary to his Catholic beliefs) for Dedalus to protest to Bloom that Dignam did not experience “the best death” ( Ibid. ). On the other hand, if he consents to Bloom’s opinion, then he must disavow the chance that his wife’s soul “is in heaven if there is a heaven

Series:

Nuno Simões Rodrigues

left unburied, the princess chooses to honor her religious and personal beliefs, burying her brother who had died in combat. Antigone is a resistant in defiance of institutionalized power, who remains faithful to her principles as well as to that which she believes is natural justice, as opposed to men

Series:

Krystian Marcin Grądz

historically, socially, and institutionally specific structure of statements, terms, categories, and beliefs.” 15 In the same spirit, Richard Rorty asserts: “… most of reality is indifferent to our descriptions of it, and … the human self is created by the use of a vocabulary rather than being adequately or

Series:

Valentine Vasak

would be soiled if they were. Indirectly, the playwright toys with the common held belief that “economic activity—especially the use of money—degrades intimate relationships, while interpersonal intimacy makes economic activity inefficient,” 15 to quote the words used by sociologist Viviana Zelizer on

Series:

Donald E. Pease

confluence of feminist, anti-war, civil rights and other cultural formations organizing what would soon be known as the counterculture. Roth’s, Kaufmann’s and Brustein’s belief that they possessed the truth of homosexual dramatic productions drew on two socially normative presuppositions: that women and

Series:

Alessandra Boller

violence report the assaults that they suffer to the Garda Síochána—the victims’ belief in the singularity of their cases is one reason for this. In this sense, The Woman Who Walked Into Doors is a novel directed against Irish media indifference and the Irish Government’s failure, in Deborah Condon

Series:

Thierry Robin

Rosset, belief in possible doubles is the main factor contributing to a build-up of dangerous illusions. However, there exists a series of phenomena which, contrary to impossible doubles, guarantee the authentic pricelessness of reality. These are of three types: shadows, reflections, and echoes