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Eamonn Wall

“Digging into the west: Tim Robinson’s Deep Landscapes” is a detailed exploration of Tim Robinson’s Stones of Aran: Pilgrimage with the purpose of describing Robinson’s response to Aran Islands landscape and his efforts to map Inishmore, the largest of the islands. Robinson begins by drawing a traditional map though, when he finds such maps lacking in scope, he moves on to create a deep-map — one that includes the history, languages, folklore, and religious beliefs of the island and its people. His prose work is compared and contrasted to Synge’s The Aran Islands, the most famous modern work that examines the islands, and it is shown the degree to which Robinson has sought to revise Synge’s interpretation. This essay is underlined by the works of other writers and scholars who have written influential works on landscape — Declan Kiberd and William Least Heat-Moon, in particular.

Series:

Gregory F. Tague

Woodruff (1978), say inferences are made about motivation before knowledge. Anne Butler et al. ( 2005 ) have gone further to say that there are versions and levels of theory of mind in birds. To know that another has a false belief is high-end theory of mind, which I will discuss momentarily. The point

Series:

Gregory F. Tague

art from all ages and countries: survival, internal conflict, mating, family, individual values, group identity, altruism and reciprocity, religious and spiritual beliefs, and warfare. This short list is indicative of behaviors that arose from selection pressures concerning the survival of our

Series:

Gregory F. Tague

Culture is a broad term that includes any number of values, beliefs, and practices of a group or across groups. There are many groups, each with its distinct culture. At the same time, I can use the terminology human culture since there are universal practices in many global communities. For our

Series:

Gregory F. Tague

other people’s perceptions, values, or beliefs. Art is a way to test ideas we form via theory of mind. Colin McGinn ( 2015 ) argues philosophically that we have innate ideas, but these are not limited to one domain, such as the natural world. Because we have abilities to create analogies and metaphors

Series:

Gregory F. Tague

at sites for ceremonies or rituals (74). In eastern parts of India, there is still supernatural belief represented in their iconography. In the Tuva Republic, north of Mongolia, a shaman who sees human forms in rocks and other spirits in fire and nature recalls Paleolithic people who imagined animal

Series:

Gregory F. Tague

works. We have certainly evolved to be predominately cognitive, but the evolutionary forces are not gone, though some might erroneously presume them to be distasteful. Cross culturally we still bond to kin and family; we express intense loyalty to groups that share our values and beliefs; we are

Series:

Gregory F. Tague

implies significant values and beliefs in her work, even if she pretends not to. Creativity risks interpretation. Natural energies do not intend to be symbolic, but an artist does. In this spirit, I think it might be instructive to have an interlude where I offer objections, and answers, to art as an

Series:

David Skilton

at a readership who expect to be introduced into a world rather like the one they hope they live in, where people are motivated by complex moral and religious beliefs, and are conscious of a multiplicity of interpersonal relations set within a larger, more intimidating world. Actions and problems now

Series:

Kristen Nassif

depicted moment. Simply put, Michals confronts the accepted belief that photography is reality. Michals is well aware of what he calls a disability, especially when dealing with portraiture, which traditionally is believed to be able to convey an individual’s psychology—just think about the eyes seen as