Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 12 items for :

  • All: "black" x
  • Philosophy, Theology & Science x
  • Chapters/Articles x
Clear All Modify Search

than taking a purely textual perspective, and explicitly stated that the people should be allowed to choose whatever they see fit in their governance. This appeal notes an essential transformation in the movement from an ideological dogmatic movement, which views reality in terms of absolutist black

In: Journal of Islamic Ethics

that the Indigenous psychology movement has grown (for example see Marsella, 2013)— All Psychology is Indigenous Psychology i.e. Latino/a Psychology, Asian Psychology, Native America Psychology, Black Psychology, Western Psychology, American Psychology etc.). This raises the question, what would

In: Journal of Islamic Ethics

du philosophe et du médecin Ibn Ṭumlūs , iii, n. 3. 56 See, Deborah L. Black, Logic and Aristotle’s “Rhetoric” and “Poetics” in Medieval Arabic Philosophy (Leiden-New York-Cologne: E.J. Brill, 1990), 247; A. Hasnawi writes: “In fact […] the inclusion of the Rhetoric and the Poetics was in the

In: Ibn Ṭumlūs (Alhagiag Bin Thalmus d. 620/1223), Compendium on Logic al-Muḫtaṣar fī al-manṭiq

SIEPM Freiburg (Germany) August 20–23, 2014, ed. Nadja Germann and Steven Harvey. 44 ‮صار هذا معروفا بين الدارسين. ويمكن العودة إلى الدراسة الجيدة والرائدة:‬‎ Deborah L. Black, Logic and Aristotle’s “Rhetoric” and “Poetics” in Medieval Arabic Philosophy (Leiden-New York-Cologne: E.J. Brill, 1990). 45

In: Ibn Ṭumlūs (Alhagiag Bin Thalmus d. 620/1223), Compendium on Logic al-Muḫtaṣar fī al-manṭiq

shadow to the remoteness it has from its subject. He mentions in this very chapter that mountains seem black and the Sun the size of a shield when viewed from afar; this lack of color and accuracy is due to distance ( buʿd ). But he maintains that the shadow is still ineluctably linked to its subject and

In: Knowing God: Ibn ʿArabī and ʿAbd al-Razzāq al-Qāshānī’s Metaphysics of the Divine

nevertheless adhering firmly to his linguistic principles and avoiding recourse to purely rational considerations. A simple example is the following ḥadīth , reported on the authority of Ibn ʿAbbās: “The Black Stone is the right hand of God on earth; whoever shakes it and kisses it, it is as if he had shaken

In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

a later work, Maqālāt al-Islāmiyyīn (Theological doctrines of the Muslims), however, his tone is calmer and his positions are less black and white, as he is freer to “take the spoils from defeated Muʿtazilism and enrich therewith a henceforth orthodox kalām ” 126 (which, for Ibn Taymiyya, it

In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

passage, where he states that judgements ( al-qaḍāʾ bi-anna ) such as that black and white are contraries ( yataḍāddān ), or that motion and rest are contradictory ( yatanāqaḍān ), or that a body cannot be in two places at one and the same time are akin to “all universal propositions that [, which

In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

Shīʿī (pl. Shīʿa) group in the third/ninth and fourth/tenth centuries known for adhering to a highly esoteric exegesis of the Qurʾān that often seemed to involve a complete disregard for the outward sense of the text. The Qarāmiṭa are perhaps most reputed for their infamous theft of the Black Stone and

In: Ibn Taymiyya on Reason and Revelation

piety minded opposition, foremost amongst whom were the Alids. 53 Abū Muslim and his army swept westward carrying black banners probably as a sign of mourning for the death of various members of the Prophet’s family, killed at the hands of the Umayyads. Abū Muslim was a brilliant statesman and general

In: Sainthood and Authority in Early Islam: Al-Ḥakīm al-Tirmidhī’s Theory of wilāya and the Reenvisioning of the Sunnī Caliphate